Communicating the New Sales Comp Plan: Key Steps Part 3

Communications Points

This is the third in a three-part series. Click here to read: Part I: Start Strong, or Part 2: Craft the Change Story.

See the Organization’s View

Company culture plays a huge role in making change. Some cultures operate on stability and are naturally change averse, while others are change tolerant and even change seeking. It’s important to know the organization’s and individuals’ comfort level with change in order to message and manage well.

Assume that most people will see any change as potentially negative. This is particularly true when it comes to compensation. From a sales organization view, unless the current compensation plan is a complete disaster, they often assume the only reason to change the plan is to manage pay or improve the company’s financial position. If you have a sales program that allows people to make money, and you want to make a change to compensation plan, you have to be crisp and clear about what those changes mean. Otherwise, the immediate thought process of a salesperson is, ‘They’re trying to figure out how to take money out of my family’s life,’” says Jeff Schmidt, global head of business continuity, security, and governance for BT Global Services.

Beyond risk, resistance also comes from reluctance to alter routines. If the new incentive plan steers the organization toward new products or perhaps selling to new customers beyond their current accounts, that can be plain uncomfortable.

In our work, we see that about 20 percent of an organization are acceptors and embrace the new plan without argument. Another 50 percent are observers who will wait and see. If the plan is designed, communicated, and managed well, this group will usually join the first group of acceptors. But as much as 30 percent of the organization may resist the new plan. The resistors range from passive resistors to active resistors.

You may recognize some of the passive resistance behaviors, which include apparent confusion, hesitancy to act, and lack of urgency. On the aggressive side, behaviors might include outright opposition and involvement in trying to change the course of the implementation by demonstrating why the program will not work. The good news is that most resistors tend to be on the passive side, although they are not always easy to identify and engage. The key to working with passive resistors is to connect, sense, and communicate at the field level to understand their resistance points before the implementation. If ignored, their resistance can become contagious. As for active resistors, they’ll test leadership’s resolve for change, as we’ll describe shortly.

 

 Contact me at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com with any questions.

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Communicating the New Sales Comp Plan: Key Steps Part 2

Communications Points

This is the second in a series. Click here to read Part I: Start Strong.

Craft the Change Story

Looking back on the Revenue Roadmap and the C-Level Goals established at the beginning of the process can help the management team explain why it decided to change the sales compensation plan this year. Usually, the organization will make a plan adjustment if there is a change in sales strategy, a change in how the organization goes to market with its sales resources and sales process, a need to respond to a competitive situation, or if the plan simply isn’t doing what the organization intended and needs some adjustment or redesign.

The change story can be told in a variety of forms, including planned messages from leadership and informal hallway conversations. In any situation, the story should be concise, consistent, and positive. The story tellers, from CEO to first line sales managers, should be well-versed in the key messages and the range of possible questions. The components of the story include:

  • Why the change is happening. Where is the organization now, and why is this change important?
  • What is changing. Is it an overall change to the organization or a tactical change to a component of the sales compensation plan?
  • Who will be affected. Will this impact certain groups or the organization overall?
  • Where the change will take place. Is it happening in certain geographies first or will it be introduced as a big bang?
  • When the change will take place. Will it happen this year? How long will it take?

To craft the change story, go back to the C-Level Goal areas of Customer, Product, Coverage, Financial, and Talent. Draw out the messages from each area that should be communicated to the sales organization and use them as the elements of the change story.

At CA Technologies, the CEO communicates the strategic vision to the entire company and then allows the sales compensation team to show how the new plan connects to his strategy. “The CEO gave us a platform upon which to make any of the changes we need to: organizational, sales model, sales compensation. We were overly transparent against the strategy and the objectives. Then we as sales leaders could literally take that and run with it for changing the organization, and it worked beautiful, absolutely beautifully,” says BJ Schaknowski, vice president of solution provider sales at CA Technologies.

It’s human nature to resist change, so positioning your change story is key to moving the organization in the right direction. Think about how you might tell the story in one of four ways. Each method can be described by its timeframe and orientation toward pain or gain as shown in Figure 8-1. Many organizations want to communicate an aspirational story that excites the team about changing to capture future opportunities (quadrant one). A sales manager or sales rep hearing this message might find it worthwhile to be part of the dream as long as it’s within the not-too-distant-future and doesn’t require too much near-term sacrifice to her lifestyle.

If a rep hears a story about avoiding risk or great pain in the future (quadrant two), that may capture a little more of her attention. For example, an executive a few years ago described her company’s situation to me, saying, “It’s all comfortable now, but our competitors are encroaching on us. We’re like the big ship in the harbor having a party, and all the little speed boats are coming in around us, and they’re going to eventually overtake and board us. People need to clearly understand where we’re heading on our current track.” Future risk can be more motivational than future vision alone if the organization can understand the eventual threat.

Gaining some benefit in a shorter timeframe (quadrant three) can be a positive motivator to make a change, especially if it’s tangible and achievable. If a rep can picture her family in a better position as her kids get to college age, she’s likely to be fully on board and put in the hard work necessary to support the plan.

The greatest motivator for change, of course, is alleviating near-term pain (quadrant four). If the company has attempted to tell a quadrant two, risk reduction story and the organization hasn’t listened, events may have transpired and the message now may be, “If we don’t make this happen by next year, this organization may have to downsize half of our people.” To a member of the sales organization, change doesn’t look quite as scary at that point because the alternatives are worse. In this case, the rep may not be fully on board but she’s also proactively looking for ways to help.

 

Next week I’ll write about how to see the organization’s view. Contact me at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com with any questions.

Communicating the New Sales Comp Plan: Key Steps Part I

Communications Points

Whether changing the sales compensation plan or making a change further upstream in the Revenue Roadmap, a change management plan with a heavy focus on communication will increase the likelihood of acceptance, and mitigate confusion in the sales organization. Doug Holland, director of HR and compensation for Manpower Group North America, says, “If we’re making a big change that’s going to affect a lot of people, the first question our CEO will ask is, ‘Why? What is the rationale for the change?’ His sensitivity is, ‘What is it going to do for the performance in the field?’  He’ll say to me things like, ‘You know Doug, if you present a compensation change for HR, marketing, finance, or IT, and it’s a bit disruptive, it’s not going to bother me. I understand that. But if you introduce a change that’s disruptive, in a bad way, in the field, that is going to bother me.’ That plan could be the greatest plan in the world. It almost doesn’t matter if people don’t understand it, if people don’t know how they’re going to grow their pay,” says Holland. It’s tempting to make one announcement or send out an email describing the new plan and consider it done. But don’t assume that because the people who designed the new plan understand it, that anyone else will. Real understanding – and the questions that pop up along the way from the end users – takes days, weeks, or sometimes months. Begin your change plan by looking at the entire process from evaluation, to plan inception, to design, to implementation. Put yourself in the shoes of the sales organization, concerned with their livelihood and any possible disruption, and develop your change plan to drive the strategy with the sales team in mind. When making your next change, consider the following six steps:

  1. Start strong. Conduct your due diligence to make sure the program is bullet-proof and ready to go.
  2. Craft the change story. Be honest about the reasons for the change, and develop a clear message around the C-level goals.
  3. See the organization’s view. Expect some resistance, and identify who those resisters might be so you can get them on board.
  4. Get the change forecast. Know your organization’s readiness for the change and your team’s resolve to see it through.
  5. Leverage the learning modes. Use multiple methods to communicate with the organization to increase the impact of your message.
  6. Follow the process. Begin communication early and follow your approach until well after introduction.

Start Strong Make sure you cover a few important checkpoints so the plan is ready for introduction. First, enlist the opinion leaders for input at the start of the process. Bring together not only executive stakeholders, but also highly-regarded representatives from the field who have a tactical operating view on the business. These opinion leaders can provide valuable input and help communicate the right messages to their peers. Second, pressure test the plan during the design phase. When the team has arrived at a good set of design drafts, expose the plan to a select group of managers or even top-performing reps for a cold look. This group could also include the opinion leaders. Pressure testing is most easily done in a small group setting or one-on-one. The objectives are to get beyond the team to see how the end users will see the plan. Ask them to react to it, describe how they think the organization might interpret it, and ask them to try and outsmart it to find the loopholes or behaviors the company may not want to motivate. This process also gains additional buy-in from the group because they’ve taken a role in the plan design. The goal is not to negotiate with them or change the design on the fly but to gather intelligence as the plan is finalized. Third, financially test the plan under a range of performance scenarios. Modeling at a high level by looking at target incentive, revenue, and cost of sales tells only part of the story. Payouts and cost of sales can vary dramatically depending upon the organization’s overall attainment of quota and how many reps attain quota. That’s because a sales compensation program often includes payout curves that reward at accelerated rates for high levels of achievement, and incorporates multiple measures that may pay independently from the primary revenue measure, So, very simply, the organization could reach its goal in aggregate but pay more or less than the targeted cost of sales based on how the team reached its goal. If the team reaches its goal on average, but does it with a combination of very high and very low performers with few average performers, then the plan may trigger upside accelerators, increasing the cost of sale for those high performers, while low performers may not cover the cost of their base salaries – a perfect storm. Know every financial angle of your plan to minimize the potential for surprises.   Next week I’ll write about how to craft the change story. Contact me at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com with any questions.

Ten Success Factors for Better Quotas: Part 2

Quota Risks

This is the second in a two-part series of Ten Success Factors for Better Quotas. Click here for Part I.

 Not setting effective quotas can critically injure even the best sales compensation plans, according to SalesGlobe research, including de-motivation, missing growth targets, and loss of high performers within the sales organization. Below are five additional steps to consider when designing quotas for your sales organization. (You can find the first 5 here.)

  1. Move Beyond History

Most organizations set quotas by looking backwards. Historic sales performance may be the primary driver of the quota, which is usually determined by taking a snapshot of the most recent year’s performance and applying a fairly standard growth rate on top of that performance. This historic approach is the source of most performance penalties that simply add a bigger expectation on top of a rep that had a great sales year. Historic quota-setting may also create a “porpoise pattern,” where sales and quota attainment leap up and then dive in alternating years. For example, a rep with great revenue performance (a leap) in year one resulting in an inflated quota in year two will often have low attainment of that inflated quota (a dive) in year two. Of course, this may then lead to a lower quota in year three followed by another leap in great performance over that low quota. And so the pattern continues. Challenge your team to acknowledge history but to lean toward forward-looking indicators of market opportunity.

  1. Balance Market Opportunity with Sales Capacity

Market opportunity should be a primary driver of the quota. More specifically, territory opportunity relative to other similar territories can give you a good indication of what portion of the total goal should be allocated to each territory.

Indicators of territory opportunity may be characteristics of accounts that correlate with revenue potential. For instance, a company in the bar-code scanning business determined that the square footage of a retail grocery store and the number of beds in a hospital were both metrics that were predictive of the potential annual sales for its scanning solutions. By applying a formula to all customers and prospects in a market or territory, the company got a relative sense of the sales potential across all markets or territories. But that indicator of market opportunity was only half of the answer. The other half was the practical physical ability, or capacity, of the sales force to close a certain amount of business. This sales capacity considers the number of hours each rep works in a year, the percentage of that time that is spent actually selling versus handling other operations and administrative activities, and the productivity of those selling hours given the time it takes to manage or close an account and close rates.

Fifteen years ago, Jeff Connor, chief growth officer for ARAMARK, had a sales force that was cut from 25 reps to 15, but the quota went up. “The executive for whom I was working at the time had some bold leadership traits. He walked into the meeting and said, ‘I’m doing away with quotas. I don’t know what the right number is. I know you guys are the best of the best and it’s a big market. Now, my number, is $100 million, and there are 15 of you. So you can all go figure it out if you want. But there are no quotas, and I’m not measuring to a quota. I want to see what we’re capable of as a team,” Connor describes.

“And guess what happened that year?  That team sold about $127 million. It was the best number ever – highest per person – and we never set a quota for anybody. The organization had a target and there were a certain number of people, but there were no incentives at the target. The compensation plan paid off of what they drove home for the business. To some extent he set the people free. It was a powerful enabler to say to your people, ‘You’re the best of the best, and I just don’t know how good you can be.’ He’s a motivator and a very good team builder, and kind of an impassioned leader. I don’t think everybody can get away with that,” says Connor.

By understanding and balancing the two sides of market opportunity and sales capacity, you can get a multi-dimensional view on how to allocate the quota.

  1. Fit the Methodology to the Account Type

One quota-setting approach does not fit all situations. While a more analytically-driven, standardized quota may work well for small accounts with a transactional sales process, a more bottom-up market opportunity approach might be better suited for a mid-sized account segment. Near the top of the account pyramid, national account quotas may be more accurately based on the information and strategies developed in an account plan. That account plan might provide input for quotas and also serve as a planning and coaching tool for sales managers to use with their account managers. Apply an appropriate approach for each type of segment or market.

  1. Make Your Approach Scalable

A telecommunications organization we worked with had reengineered and piloted its new quota process that incorporated top-down and bottom-up inputs, predictive market data, and precise steps for the entire team to work through the process. It all worked well during the pilot phase only for the company to find out after full introduction that the process was just too complicated, delicate, and unwieldy. The process that worked perfectly in a contained environment just couldn’t scale in the organization without coming apart at the seams. Further, it was creating workload demands to manually manage steps and exceptions that weren’t captured in a non-scaled environment. Err toward the side of simplicity. Accounting for every possibility may not be much more accurate but can certainly be much more manpower-intensive than using a simpler, streamlined approach.

  1. Don’t Over, Over-Allocate

A sales leader in a Fortune 100 transportation company recently asked me a very straightforward question: “Why is it that our CFO reported to Wall Street that we were on plan for revenue for the quarter, yet leadership is beating on us because we’re behind plan in the field?” As we examined the question, the answer became clear. It was a case of over, over-allocation of the quota.

Over-allocation refers to the approach of taking the sales goal for the business overall and, as it is allocated to the next level of management, adding a little extra to that goal. The sum of all unique, non-overlapping front line sales quotas compared to the company’s goal is a simple measure of quota over-allocation. For example, a company with a $1 billion corporate goal with a sum of all front line quotas of $1.05 billion has over-allocated its goal by five percent. Most organizations over-allocate quotas by about three percent to five percent from top goal to front line. That little extra allocation acts like an insurance policy. If the manager has a sales position that remains unfilled for a period of time with no one to effectively cover that territory, the over-allocation makes up for some of that loss. If a rep falls dramatically short on his quota, the over-allocation also makes up for some of that performance shortfall.

Over-allocation, within limits, can keep the organization on-track with its quota. However, when the quota is over-allocated too much at too many levels, it can lead to distortion on the front-line. In the case of the transportation company, the company had over-allocated its goal to a point where the C-level and the front line had two different realities. The sun was shining at the C-level while the front line saw only cloudy skies. Keep your quota allocation trim so that executives and reps all participate in the company’s success.

 

Next week I’ll write about 5 different quota-setting methodologies. Contact me at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com with any questions.

The Six Dimensions of Sales Roles

6 Dimensions of Sales Roles

Defining sales roles has a direct connection to the sales compensation plan. When identifying those roles, consider six dimensions. A sales role (channel or job) is comprised of multiple factors that make it effective, yet can stretch its capabilities to a point that either maximizes or limits its effectiveness.  The factors below must be considered when structuring and managing sales roles. You can use these to define sales roles pretty specifically down to what you will need for the organization and for the compensation plan.

  1. Sales Strategy Responsibility

This dimension defines the type of customers the organization is targeting. Is the company retaining current customers? Is it penetrating current customers through either product penetration (selling more of the same products) or buyer penetration (getting additional buyers)? Is it pursuing customer acquisition? This combination of possibilities provides overall direction for the job.

  1. Product Responsibility

This dimension describes the products, services, and offers the job will bring to market. Does the rep sell one product, multiple products, or the whole portfolio? The more products each rep is asked to represent, the more his bandwidth is stretched. A product specialist, for example, should be focused and narrow. A rep selling the whole portfolio may need some overlay specialists for support, especially if it’s a complex offering.

  1. Market Segment and Channel Responsibility

For reps working directly with customers, this dimension identifies the groups and characteristics of those customers. Market segments can be defined as simply major accounts, key accounts, middle market accounts, and core accounts; or they might be defined by customers, values, or needs. Market segments may also be described vertically, such as healthcare or transportation, or a combination of these variables.

Channel responsibility refers to coverage and management of third party channels. An organization might use distributors, resellers, referral partners, or other types of third party businesses to help get to customers. In that case, it will usually use a role that works with its channel partners. In fact, it may need two roles: a channel acquisition role (someone to go out and acquire those relationships) and a channel management role (somebody to manage, cultivate and develop those relationships).

  1. Sales Process Responsibility

This dimension refers to the breadth of the sales process the job will span. The sales process may be expansive covering lead generation, qualification, solution design, proposal development, deal closing, and even implementation.

If you ask a sales person to do all of those things – going from lead generation all the way through the close and the implementation – it stretches his bandwidth. That requires a broad set of skills, as compared to having some jobs that are lead generators or maybe – odd concept – marketing generating an abundance of leads. One role may pick up qualified leads, close them, and turn them over to an implementation specialist. Many organizations over-simplify what’s really required in the sales process.

  1. Marketing, Technical, and Operations Responsibilities

Some jobs will have dual responsibilities, performing disparate functions. Some jobs are contaminated with other operations roles and have been cobbled together over time. Moving non-selling roles to other functions out of sales can help clean up the sales job and increase its effectiveness.

  1. Management Responsibility

This dimension identifies roles the job may have in managing other people in addition to selling. The classic jobs affected by management responsibilities are the selling sales manager and the selling branch manager. These combination roles often appear in organizations with emerging management levels. Having a seller straddle both sales and management is sometimes a first step toward pure management jobs that allows the organization to still attach a unique quota to the job and align its cost with a revenue stream. The reality is sharing a dual selling and management role can create conflicting priorities. A pure management role, effectively defined and staffed, can provide a much greater revenue impact through leadership and development of multiple sellers.

The big concept concerning sales roles dimensions is that the more a job is asked to do, the more stretched it gets, the less effective the job becomes. This customer coverage discipline of job definition is important to understand to make the organization more effective and to have a solid foundation for the compensation program. Once you decide which breeds of dogs your organization needs and clarify their priorities, it’s time to begin compensation plan design.

 

Next week I’ll write about how to differentiate your top performers. Contact me at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com with any questions.

The Three Strategies for Revenue Growth

RPN

When companies grow from year to year, they don’t grow in a straight line. They hold onto some revenue from current customers, they lose some revenue and customers, and they grow in other areas. Analyzing the ebb and flow of revenue and profit can help a company understand how it grows, plan for future growth, align sales roles, and motivate the right results in those roles.

The dimensions of buyers (both current customers and prospects) and offers (current and new products or services) describe a range of possible revenue flow opportunities. Among the possibilities are really just three basic strategies.

  1. An organization can retain the revenue from its current customers, which is called retention selling. While it may not actually lose any customer companies from one year to the next, an organization will usually lose some of its current revenue from current offers. It’s deceptive. The customer remains, but some of the business is lost. In fact, the average business-to-business sales organization retains only about 84 percent of its prior year revenue. So, to grow it has to find new revenue.
  2. A company can grow revenue from its current customers, which is called penetration selling. Penetration selling breaks into two different types of selling. Buyer penetration is gaining additional buyers for the same product or service. For example, a shipping company that focuses on ground transportation would try to get more buyers within the same large customer account to use their services instead of another carrier or shipping method. Product penetration is growing with additional products the customer may not be purchasing. So that same shipping company might capture more current customer growth by selling its air shipping service to a customer that’s already using the ground service.
  3. A company can create revenue through new customer selling, which also breaks into two types. New competitive wins provide growth through new customers who are already purchasing similar products from competitors. The shipping company may win a new contract of international shipping from a competitor who held that business last year. New market selling is developing a new opportunity with a new customer that hasn’t purchased that product before. For example, the shipping company may offer logistics services to a new customer to help them improve the operations of their warehouse facilities. Of course this strategy could ultimately result in the company winning the customer’s shipping business, too.

This is a good tool to plan coverage and sales roles and determine what breeds of seller the organization needs.

 

Next week I’ll write about the six dimensions of sales roles. Contact me at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com with any questions or visit www.SalesGlobe.com. 

 

C-Level in Sales Comp: Getting Involved and Supporting the Program

In order for sales compensation to work, the C-level goals of the company have to be incorporated. But at what point should the C-level get involved to communicate those goals?

Certainly at the beginning of the process, to discuss strategic direction and short and long term goals. And in fact, 23 percent of C-levels participate periodically in design team meetings, according to a recent SalesGlobe survey. However, most C-levels and their teams give caution about getting too involved in the details. It pulls the C-level out of his area of strength and sometimes turns him into the bull in the China shop. About 36 percent of C-levels get involved in the details occasionally, but very few (about five percent) get involved in the details frequently. For the inquisitive, high-IQ CEO or president, it takes a certain level of self-control, and team reinforcement to prevent this from happening.

The head of sales compensation at a large software company limits the number of design options he shows the CEO, in order to prevent him from spending too much time on the details. “It works very well,” he said, because, “too much information and too many options can be confusing. But our CEO got involved this year at the end of the process. We were pretty much done with the plans, and then all of a sudden he wanted to take a look at them. He comes at it with a very different style. …We had to change the plans, and it took us another month and a half to get them approved, which made it interesting. He was definitely involved to a degree this year to where next year, we’ll integrate his expectations before starting the design.”

In our study, the more than 50 companies we examined that had a blend of C-level involvement had an average three-year compound annual growth rate of approximately 7.5 percent compared to the Fortune 500, which had growth of about half a percent and the Fortune 100 which had growth of  about 2 percent over the same period ending 2012.

While the right type of C-level involvement in incentive plans is certainly not the primary cause of higher growth, it is likely indicative of greater C-level involvement in the workings of the sales organization overall and the practical drivers of growth.

Join us for a complimentary webinar today, September 17, 2013, at 2:00 PM eastern, on making the C-level to street level connection through your sales compensation plan. Or, contact us at Mark.Donnolo@salesglobe.com for a recording of the webinar.

 

Mark Donnolo is the managing partner of SalesGlobe and author of What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation. To learn more, visit SalesGlobe

Training Without Coaching

A WSJ article once cited that, “With some studies suggesting that just 10% to 40% of training is ever used on the job, it is clear that a big chunk of the tens of billions of dollars organizations spend annually on staff development is going down the drain.”

Picture2Part of the problem – and, of course, the solution – lies in coaching.

When calculating the ROI of training, consider:

  • 25% of ROI comes from what you do before the event (the actual training).
  • 25% of ROI comes from the event itself.
  • 50% comes from activity after the event (coaching).

That’s half of the ROI, yet too few companies follow through with coaching. In a Sisyphean-like endeavor, sales organizations send folks through training, expect them to return transformed, and then watch as the organization inevitably returns to its old pre-training ways.

Not surprisingly, many companies (44%, according to a recent SalesGlobe survey) aren’t clear on the benefits of coaching and don’t measure the effectiveness of their sales coaching programs. Of those who do measure the effectiveness of coaching, the top benefits they see from their coaching programs are:

  • an increase in sales productivity per rep;
  • an increase in close rates;
  • an increase in their ability to cross sell or sell complex solutions or complex products;
  • an increase in revenue or profits.

In terms of ROI, about half of companies (48%) report that they get a return greater than their investment in coaching and development, or a return multiples greater than their investment. And an additional 32% of companies at least recover their costs from coaching.

So what’s your view on coaching? Necessary, unnecessary, or truly worthwhile?

Read an excerpt from our new book, “What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation.” Or, to learn more, visit us at SalesGlobe.

Four Big Needs for Effective Sales

Go ahead and get excited about this.

When we talk about the Revenue Roadmap, people get excited. There’s a physical change in the room. People lean in, sit on the edges of their chairs, and put down phones.

I’m not kidding.

Revenue RoadmapWhenever we discuss the Revenue Roadmap, sales leaders instantly recognize a plan – a map – a well organized set of ideas that are crucial to effective sales. The ideas below are in top-to-bottom order, too. You need to have Insight on your customers and your business before you can move on to your Sales Strategy, and so on. We find that when sales organizations try to tackle one of the lower levels – Enablement, for example, which includes training and sales compensation – without carefully reviewing the upper disciplines, the solution won’t be as effective. It sounds obvious – you can’t have a great sales comp plan unless you understand the sales strategy, and you can’t have a great sales strategy unless you understand your customers’ needs – but you’d be surprised how many sales organizations operate without going through each of these disciplines.

So here they are. Let us know what you think.

 

Insight

The first layer of the Revenue Roadmap, insight, pertains to understanding the market and competitors and how the business is performing. Insight is the highest level competency: understanding the voice of the customer, the macro market, competitor moves, and the performance of the business. That insight will drive certain decisions to the next downstream level, which is sales strategy.

Listening to the voice of the customer is a critical starting point. Sales leaders must understand the needs and expectations of their customers and their performance relative to those expectations. That insight allows leaders to see any gaps and determine where they can improve value proposition, sales coverage, and sales process.

Sales leaders also need to consider what’s going on in the macro market environment, especially as it relates to their industry. Certain shifts in the economic environment can – over the long term – drive decisions about the sales strategy and how they might plan for where the market is going, as opposed to where they are right now.

It’s essential to know how competitors are performing from a growth and financial perspective. Sales leaders also have to understand their competitors’ offers to the market and how they are positioning their products and services.

Finally, sales leaders should look at the company’s historic and projected revenue and profit performance. This evaluation should consider whether growth has come through the retention of current customer revenue, the penetration of customers through increased usage or additional products, or the acquisition of new customers. By understanding the business performance they can see where they’ve been strong and where they’ve been weak, and they can adjust their sales strategy accordingly.

Sales Strategy

The second layer, sales strategy, defines the sales organization’s action plan to achieve its goal. The sales strategy will drive decisions concerning product and service focus, concentration on certain markets, value propositions, and the resulting approach to market.

First and foremost to the strategy, it’s critical to define the core and strategic products and services the business provides. In many companies these are developed based on the needs of certain customer segments. Too often however, products or services are internally driven and may not align naturally with customer needs, requiring a significant change in the offer or value proposition.

The organization determines how it will organize and prioritize customers and prospects through its segmentation and targeting. The most effective segmentation and targeting considers characteristics such as customer industry, sales potential, profitability, common needs, and overall fit with the sales organization’s business.

It’s important that segmentation and targeting flow into a plan that’s actionable by the sales organization. Simply defining the segment at a high level is not going to answer the sales rep’s question “Who do I go see on Monday morning?”

The value proposition goes beyond what the sales organization communicates to customers and articulates the organization’s understanding of the customer’s business and issues, what the organization can accomplish for the customer, and how the organization differentiates itself from the competition. The highest level value proposition is usually communicated at a company level. To be effective for sales however, the organization must convert its value proposition to sales messages that can be communicated at the segment level, customer level, and deal level to adapt to changing situations and customer needs.

When developing the approach to market, sales leaders should incorporate decisions about product, service, target segments, value propositions, and potential sales resources into a plan that can be executed by the sales organization. The customer coverage layer converts that plan into action..

Customer Coverage

Customer coverage, the third layer, defines how the organization will use its channels, roles, processes, and resources to go to market.

Sales channels outline the overall routes to market, whether they’re third party companies such as resellers, referral partners, retailers, or whether they’re part of the company sales force which could include a range of sales jobs. Sales leaders need to base the selection of their sales channel mix on factors like how the customer prefers to buy, how channel partners might improve the overall product offer, their ability to reach customers in different markets, and the financial efficiency of using lower cost channels to reach certain customers or conduct certain types of sales or service transactions.

Within sales roles and structure sales leaders must consider the types of sales and support jobs they’re going to use and how the organization is structured around those jobs. Sales jobs typically will align to customer segments and can range from global account management to field sales to inside sales. The structure may be developed around key segments – for example, the telecommunications industry or major accounts. It may also be defined around certain geographies, functional roles, or some combination.

Sales channels and sales roles integrate with the processes for working with customers. In fact, the best customer coverage models are built from the customer’s buying process with a sales process and roles that reflect how the customer prefers to work. Sales processes lay out the common approaches for how the sales team  identifies prospects, qualifies opportunities, develops solutions, manages the momentum, closes the sale, and implements the product or service for the customer. While sales processes vary widely even within a single sales organization it’s important to define the optimal or preferred sales process as a foundational point for the organization to manage and optimize performance.

Sales deployment maps the feet on the street and the level of sales resources needed for each of the sales roles by geographies, segments, or other forms of account assignment. Deployment is typically guided by a combination of sales capacity (available sales time and workload) to manage current accounts or sell to new accounts, sales role and customer alignments, and logistical factors like geography and travel patterns.

Enablement

Enablement, the final layer of the Revenue Roadmap, supports all of the upstream disciplines within Customer Coverage, Sales Strategy, and Insight. Enablement includes areas such as incentive compensation and quotas, which aligns sellers to the sales strategy. It includes recruiting and retention, which define the current inventory of talent and determine how the organization is going to attract and retain the right talent for the long term.  Training and development builds the capabilities of the organization for people currently in their jobs and in junior roles that will progress into key sales roles. Tools and technology provide leverage by enhancing the effectiveness of gaining insight and implementing the organization’s decisions around sales strategy, customer coverage, and enablement.

 

Please review our new book, What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation, and let us know what you think! To learn more, visit us at SalesGlobe.

Your Revenue Roadmap: Driving Your Sales Strategy with Compensation

Revenue RoadmapOn a chilly morning in Sacramento, I sat perched on a vinyl bench seat, warily eyeing my rolling workplace for the day: an 18-wheeler, windows fogged from the cold, vibrating slightly as its engine idled. My tour guide, Cliff, was a driver sales rep for a major brewing company. Cliff climbed into the cab, slid over to the driver’s seat, and we pulled away from the distributor’s warehouse towards a 10-hour day of sales calls to convenience stores, supermarkets, bars, and restaurants.

As we drove, we talked about how Cliff sold beer. He had been with the company for a number of years and was very successful, but he explained that his role had changed. “Two years ago, I was selling cases of beer to store owners. Now, I’m trying to make the beer they already have move faster. I check the signs, inspect the coolers, and try to get our beer in the best position.” In addition to being a driver sales rep, Cliff had become a bit of a marketer, too, since the company had changed his objectives a short time ago.

In the parking lot of a convenience store in a gritty urban neighborhood, Cliff dragged down a hand truck and I followed him to the back of the store and into a huge cooler which held cases upon cases of light beer, regular beer, and premium beer in 12-ounce, 16-ounce, and quart containers. Cliff looked through the stacks, pulled the expired boxes, and loaded them into the truck. He then lugged beer from the truck and packed it into the cooler. As he did this he talked to the convenience store owner about what was selling and what was not. Then he detailed the cooler display at the front of the store, making sure the facings of cans and bottles were aligned and that the packaging and tags for the week’s specials were clearly displayed.

The brewery Cliff worked for had changed its sales strategy recently. The old approach was to sell as many cases of beer as possible, as often as possible, to as many retailers and restaurants as possible. Cliff and the other driver sales reps were paid cents per case commission to load more cases into the cooler, rotate the stock, and pull out old beer.

Eventually, the brewing company realized that pushing more bottles and cans into the backroom of a retailer wasn’t necessarily selling more beer to the customer. With competition at the point of sale increasing over the years, sales out was less driven by stocking the cooler and more driven by effective marketing. Strategically, what was important to the brewing company was selling beer to the end consumer. The company learned that the consumption of beer was driven by TV, radio, and social media advertising. Point of sale advertising, they discovered, was another driving force.

For years the company had missed the opportunity to mobilize the driver reps and had motivated them toward the wrong goal. It had mistakenly promoted a transactional model of selling into the backroom. Finally they realized what actually sold beer – product placement, use of signs and displays, and matching price points with competitors. But the question remained: how did that translate to the sales organization? How could this strategy convert to incentives meaningful to the driver sales reps?

The quest for that answer found me undercover in a convenience store cooler, wearing a starched uniform with “Mark” neatly scripted above my left shirt pocket. We worked with the company to determine how to motivate the sales organization with performance indicators that could ultimately steer consumer preference. The company moved their sales compensation plan off of a purely volume-based plan and connected it to the metrics and activities that drove beer consumption. They developed performance measures that were focused on merchandising such as the number of facings, the position of the product closest to the cooler handle, the placement of signage in the retailer, the positioning of large displays, and competitive matching. If their competitor’s malt liquor was in 32-ounce bottles, they made sure their 32-ounce bottles of malt liquor were positioned right next to them, hopefully with a larger number of facings.

By understanding what influenced the purchase of beer and connecting it to something that was important to the driver sales rep, the company was able to change the behaviors of the reps and get them to sell more beer. Now, Cliff talked to the store owner not only about how many cases of beer he wanted and yesterday’s baseball scores, but also how the beer was selling and ideas he had about improving the marketing of certain products. He talked about the positioning of the product and displays, and he had statistics on how much that could increase the volume. The store owner listened because he knew Cliff’s advice was in his best interest.

Because Cliff’s compensation changed, his conversations changed. Because his conversations changed, the results changed. This retailer had struggled with the sale of premium beer brands in this particular market, but had seen a dramatic improvement in those sales over the past 24 months because of Cliff’s marketing.

The company and Cliff had learned an important lesson about translating the new sales strategy to the front line. The customer learned an important lesson about how to improve the results for his business, and together the company and the customer saw significant improvement in results, demonstrating the power of sales compensation and its connection to the sales strategy.

Aligning to the Strategy

One of the first things our firm does when we look at sales compensation is understand the sales strategy. We ask: How should the priorities of the business be represented in the sales compensation plan?

One of the ironies of sales compensation is that while it’s a tactical program, it can churn up issues that are actually bigger sales effectiveness misalignments. For example, Cliff’s sales compensation plan paid him for generating pure sales volume, an activity that was out of alignment with the company’s strategy of positioning product competitively and playing an advisor role to help the retailer grow its business.  A transactional plan like this would ultimately cause a breakdown in the company’s ability to achieve its goals. Sales executives have to be able to distinguish between issues that are sales compensation related and those that are indicators of bigger strategic challenges. They have to know when they have a sales process issue that needs to be fixed.

Mike Kelly, former CEO and president of The Weather Channel Companies, began his career years ago at Fortune magazine. There, Kelly worked directly with the business customer – sometimes the CEO of the company – who would have a personal preference for a business magazine, whether it was Fortune or Forbes or Business Week. Because the decision maker was at a senior level in the organization, it was important to understand the corporate strategy. When Kelly took over the sales organization of a new magazine, Entertainment Weekly, he took that customer orientation with him.

Traditionally, a magazine would research target companies and try to prove to clients and agencies that their audience was the right audience, as opposed to trying to connect their customers and advertisers to the subject matter. But Kelly implemented a customized, consultative approach, connecting advertisers to entertainment marketing. Unfortunately, Kelly explains, “We over-customized it, and the organization had a hard time making money.”

Entertainment Weekly was scheduled to be profitable after two years, but by year five it was still losing money and Kelly was feeling some pressure. “We would always point to our growth. Our circulation growth was great, our revenue growth was great, and everybody assumed, ‘Okay, at some point or another we’re going to get to profitability.’”

Kelly enrolled himself in an executive education class at Columbia University where he met Professor Selden, who talked about an idea called customer segmentation. He told his class the best companies understand not only who their customer is but also what their customer’s needs are. They group their customers based on needs as opposed to what they want to sell them. By segmenting his customers Kelly could understand the profitability of each customer and each customer segment. Then he could align his resources against those customer segments that were most profitable.

“It was revolutionary for me,” says Kelly. “No one – and certainly no one in the magazine industry – thought that way. All revenue was good revenue. And we typically thought our biggest customers, our highest volume customers, were the most profitable customers.”

So Kelly took this idea back to Entertainment Weekly, and his team analyzed the profitability of all of the advertisers and all of their segments. They figured out that cable advertising was starting to explode. Networks wouldn’t let cable channels advertise on television because they thought they would steal viewers. Cable had to buy print advertising; it was the biggest, broadest reach they could get. Entertainment Weekly had a smattering of cable channel advertisers, but it hadn’t been a big focus. Kelly and his team had concentrated on what everybody else was concentrating on – automotive companies and health and beauty companies. They were big advertisers that had a lot of appeal but were price sensitive. Kelly, however, realized that the cable television advertisers were actually their most profitable advertisers because they paid full price; they were time sensitive – they had to be in certain issues in the magazine because the show was on a certain night – all the factors that compelled them to pay a premium.

Kelly completely changed how his organization thought about who their customer was, who their most profitable customers were, and how they should go after their customers. He realigned the sales force, putting more people on the most profitable categories with strong growth expectations and sales incentives and fewer resources against the customers for whom it was really just a price buy.

“We were supposed to lose money that year,” Kelly says. “We made money. And then we went on to have 30 percent CAGR [compound annual growth rate] for the next five years.

“I learned that sales is sales. But there are principles of finance that if you apply them to sales, including incentive plans, you can accelerate what you do. I’ve brought that to every other job I’ve had. We really try to understand who the customer is and what our value proposition is to that customer. Then we segment those customers so we understand who the most profitable ones are and who they aren’t. We put our resources behind that profit.

“If your compensation plan doesn’t align with the strategy and the segments you want to target, then you’re going to be working at cross purposes. It’s hard work to get an organization, any organization, to start to think differently. And in most companies, sales is product-focused or platform-focused. They’re going to go sell their product wherever they can. When a company becomes more customer focused, all of a sudden it starts to define the product mix based on what the customer needs are.”  The sales compensation program can either support that customer focus, run counter to that focus, or create confusion. In Kelly’s case, the priorities of the sales strategy were well-represented in the sales compensation plan, and it drove the desired behavior.

The Four Layers of the Revenue Roadmap: Connecting Your Sales Strategy and Compensation

When thinking about sales strategy and sales compensation, it’s critical to have a framework. “The comp plan is the caboose, not the engine,” says Doug Holland, director of human resources and compensation for Manpower Group North America, a global workforce solutions company. “Compensation should never be driving the strategy. The strategy drives the compensation. It’s incredible, especially in times of stress, how that message can kind of get lost.  Comp issues are often symptoms of bigger problems, and it’s the easiest, most tangible thing to look at. The challenge is, do we have the right job designs? Do we have the right people? Those are harder conversations. That’s often the struggle with comp plans.”

We developed the Revenue Roadmap from our decades of work with hundreds of high performing sales organizations. The Revenue Roadmap identifies four major layers, or competency areas, and 16 related disciplines that must connect for the organization to grow profitably.

To learn more about What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation, visit the book’s website, or purchase a copy on Amazon or Barnes and Noble. To learn more about SalesGlobe, please visit us at www.SalesGlobe.com.

What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Comp

Our new book is out! Read an excerpt below and let us know what you think!

Book Cover 3The office lights flicker on at 7:00 Monday morning. The early risers arrive and the staff trickles in. The CEO, vice president of sales, CMO, and vice president of human resources sip their first cups of coffee, bleary-eyed from Sunday evening’s conference calls. The office chatter starts. In an hour the phones will begin to ring. A few miles away, manufacturing has been busy at the line for a couple of hours by now.

Despite the bustling activity, it will all come to a halt if the next sale isn’t made. “Sales” is the top line on nearly every income statement. Without it, the funding runs out, the stock doesn’t trade, the lights no longer burn, and the office chatter falls silent.

At the root of sales is a team of tenacious souls squeezed in middle seats without upgrades, walking the hallways of major corporations, making outbound calls to semi-qualified prospects, pacing customer reception areas waiting for a chance to have that critical conversation about the customer’s needs, and generally wearing out the soles of their Cole Haans. Each year on average, they experience eight to ten times more rejection than acceptance from their prospective customers. Yet they persevere – most with continued optimism – in pursuit of the close, the add-on sale, the contract renewal. Most of them are driven by a quest for three things: personal accomplishment, recognition, and compensation … sales compensation … commission … bonus … the deal that makes their year and the company’s year.

The sales compensation plan is one of the most significant drivers of performance in the sales organization and represents one of the single largest expenses a company will incur, commonly tens or hundreds of millions of dollars. It’s a thin but vital long distance line that keeps the daily connection between corporate growth and the rep on the street. It guides and motivates the actions of the sales organization more than any other single factor. It trumps leadership messages, sales strategies, sales management, and sales training. If there is a hard wire between the customer’s office and the corner office, sales compensation is it.

But if the plan’s message isn’t clear or to their liking, sales reps will interpret the plan in their own financial interest. As a corporate leader, you’ll get what you measure and what you pay for – and it may not always be what you expect.

While its impact can be direct, it’s a fine blend of art and science that has long been a point of conflict within companies. Everyone has an opinion about sales compensation and everyone is an expert, yet few agree on the best approach to drive performance toward the company’s objectives. Sales, sales operations, human resources, and finance regularly engage in battles over questions like:

  • Does the plan represent our business objectives?
  • Are our highest paid sales people actually our top performers?
  • Is the plan too expensive?
  • Can we better motivate our organization to pursue the sales strategy?
  • How can we promote more of a performance-oriented sales culture?
  • Can we make the plan simpler to understand?
  • Can we make the plan easier to administer?
  • Are sales quotas penalizing our best performers?
  • How can we set quotas that better represent the sales potential in our markets?

Too often these battles lead to sales compensation programs that are compromises between parties, ultimately leading to underperformance in the business. Above the fray, senior executives look on, often asking only the most general questions. Many of these senior executives, concerned about the next quarter and the remainder of the year, miss opportunities to use sales compensation as tool to drive growth.

What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation is not a technical guide for designing a sales compensation plan. This is a book that tells the stories of how senior leaders in a company can understand the connection between their goals and sales performance to leverage sales compensation as a driver of real growth in their organizations. We’ll focus on the top challenges in companies today and offer logical leadership approaches for dealing with each of these issues.

What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation, written by Mark Donnolo, managing partner of SalesGlobe, is available now on Amazon.com.

What’s Your ROI on Coaching?

We can all probably agree that coaching and development are important, but we can also probably agree that good coaching programs can be expensive.  So, in terms of a financial return, what can you expect for your investment?

In a recent SalesGlobe survey, about half of companies (48%) reported that they get a return greater than their investment in coaching and development, or a return multiples greater than their investment. And an additional 32% of companies at least recover their costs from coaching.

graphOn the “return” side of the ROI calculation, the outcome from coaching is not always clear or near-term. While productivity levels and close rates may appear to be clear metrics for coaching success, those metrics may be driven by other organization and market factors in addition to the coaching program. Improvements in sales capability can develop over time as well. For instance, learning more effective methods for developing the business case and value proposition for strategic accounts may yield results months later when those opportunities naturally present themselves over a long sales process. While the effect of coaching is there, its impact may be latent for some period of time.

But measuring ROI is not an exact science. Companies report several challenges in tracking this information. For example, on the “investment” side of the ROI calculation, coaching in many organizations is conducted informally at the manager level and is not practiced consistently in the field. This makes it difficult to measure the actual resources, both hard and soft dollars, invested in coaching. Also, coaching is often blended with other management roles and not clearly tracked by the organization.

What sort of financial returns should you expect on your coaching investment?

 

To learn more, visit us at SalesGlobe.

Coaching Is Important … But When Do I Do That, Again?

So we can all probably agree that coaching and development for the sales organization are important – even vitally important. But there tends to be so much confusion around it.

Last week I wrote that optimally a sales manager should spend 30% to 40% of his or her time coaching her reps. But we all know that rarely happens. In fact, when we mention that optimal amount of time – 30% to 40% for coaching – we get a range of reactions, from puzzled to shocked, as managers think about all of their other responsibilities.

The reality is most sales managers spend less than 20% of their time coaching. That statistic illustrates a gap of about 60% between how much time managers should spend coaching their organizations and how much time they’re actually spending.

So what’s to blame? Many things, probably. For one, the mandate for coaching may not be getting through from executives to managers.

what preventsAnother issue – and one of the biggest challenges we see in both sales management jobs and sales jobs – is the time available to focus on their core responsibilities, whether they are still selling or purely managing.

A full 70% of companies say that sales managers are held back from coaching because they are too busy with aspects of their job that aren’t always related to sales or sales management. Oops. A deeper look reveals that many of these responsibilities are administrative or operational in nature – responsibilities that do not have a direct impact on either revenue growth or the development of the team that produces revenue.

Time constraints can take another form. Forty percent of companies said that sales managers just don’t make the time to effectively coach, meaning they are finding other things to do with their time. Perhaps they are even deliberately avoiding that ominous task.

We know from our research and our work at SalesGlobe that a big part of coaching comes down to the priorities of the organization. About one in seven companies (14%) do not require their sales managers to do any kind of coaching or development. If coaching is not a requirement of the organization, other responsibilities – whether they are selling or administration – will always take the front seat.

Beyond time, the other top barriers are around knowledge and importance. Forty-four percent of companies said managers do not know how to coach effectively. Therefore, even if they are given the time they do not know what to do with that time. Another 19% said they do not have a methodology for managers to use when they have time to coach.

With all the time constraints precluding managers from coaching it’s important to have a program in place. There is a right way and a wrong way to coach reps. (Hint: selling for them is a wrong way.)It’s important to build a coaching program and methodology that fits your organization. Using a standard coaching program – one off the shelf or one being used by another company – is certain to fail. A program that is a good fit for one organization may be a poor fit for your organization. Determine the priorities for your coaching program. Understand from a customer perspective where your weak points are and engage your leadership team in developing the right program for your business.

To learn more visit us at SalesGlobe.

2013: Questions for a Lucky Year

Whether 2012 was a banner year for your sales organization or one preferably forgotten, it’s winding down. It’s time to start looking forward to 2013, that oh-so lucky sounding year.

But fear not. Even the most superstitious among us can make 2013 absolutely providential with a little planning. High performing sales organizations operate around four key areas: Sales Insight, Sales Strategy, Sales Coverage, and Sales Enablement. Together, this knowledge helps to create a clear strategy that will make sense on the front line, and drive productivity all year.

Sales Insight comes first, because it’s essential to really understand what’s happening in your market.  Without insight into your industry and competitors, it’s next to impossible to plan an effective strategy.

Take the time to consider these key Sales Insight questions before diving into sales strategy or coverage planning for 2013:

  1. First and foremost, what’s happening in our macro market? What’s happening in our economy overall?
  2. What about your market? Was 2012 really a banner year for your industry or a dismal one? Why?
  3. How did your competitors perform this year? Do you know what led to their successes or failures?
  4. What do your customers say about your sales organization? Did you meet, exceed, or fall short of their expectations this year? Do you truly understand the needs of your customers?
  5. Where did the revenue for your company come from this year? Did you retain current customers? Did you sell new products or services to those current customers? What percentage of revenue came from new customers?
  6. What were the major strengths and weaknesses of your sales organization in 2012?

What other ways can you gain insight that will help your planning, and make 2013 the “luckiest” year ever?

To learn more, visit us at SalesGlobe.

For the C-Level

Late last fall, a group of senior sales leaders of a high-tech hardware company found themselves stuck. Their problems began 10 months earlier when the sales leaders embarked on their annual sales compensation review and design cycle. They went through the rounds of interviews and surveys with the sales organization, worked through alternatives for the plan, and arrived at a final set of compensation designs in early winter. The CEO, Edward, heard updates throughout the design phase and deferred to the executive steering committee. It was a long process that year because the company had shifted its focus slightly to include some additional software that complemented its hardware products. The sales leaders worked through the complexities with the executive steering committee and kept the sales compensation program relatively simple. The CEO continued to receive updates and defer to the executive steering committee.

As November passed, the sales leaders met with the executive steering committee for final review and approval of the new sales compensation program. The plan had been financially modeled for any imaginable situation, but it still had to be communicated to sales directors, sales managers, and opinion leaders in the field. All that remained was the formality of getting the CEO’s “nod.”

“What do they say about the best laid plans,” one of the SVPs of sales asked rhetorically. “We had the presentation down. It was very simple: a few pages, big diagrams, the strategy, where we are now, and what we’re going to change. Edward had already seen it all, in pieces, as we designed it. But we got a few pages into the presentation, and he started asking questions that sounded like he hadn’t seen the plans before.”

The other SVP chimed in. “The first question was about our planned mix of software and services by segment, and why we didn’t have an incentive measuring that for each rep. We talked about that a number of times with the executive steering committee months earlier and agreed to keep it at the sales management level and have them manage it during year one until we had some reliable numbers to set goals. Then Ed started digging into the financial modeling and challenging us about why the plan would pay more than the targeted cost of sales if we hit our company goal on average but had a lot of high performers. The team had agreed on the above-quota accelerators, and that’s what happens with accelerators. There were a bunch of other questions after that but I started to get a little irritated, because it was clear that Ed just wasn’t connected. We worked hard on keeping him informed, but when he finally locked in, we were at the end of the game. We ran this program by the field, we worked through all the details, and now it’s like we’re starting back in September and it’s practically December. So, we need to make some adjustments pretty quickly to keep the wheels on this thing for January.”

C-level executives get involved in various ways during the sales compensation process. Too much involvement too late can wreak havoc on the labor-intensive and time-consuming design process. It can also undermine the heavy lifting already done by the design team and the confidence the C-level has placed in the team. On the other hand, zero C-level involvement isn’t the right strategy, either. While the compensation design team may be brilliant, a brilliant sales compensation plan must line up with the vision for company-wide growth, which most often must come directly from the corner office.

We recently looked at C-level participation across a range of companies and found in 82% of companies high-value involvement peaks at the start of the process to provide strategic direction and 55% provide guidance on the priorities of the compensation plan.

According to our survey, 23 percent of C-levels participate periodically in design team meetings. However, most C-levels and their teams give caution about getting too involved in the details. It pulls the C-level out of his area of strength and sometimes turns him into the bull in the China shop. About 36 percent of C-levels get involved in the details occasionally, but very few (about five percent) get involved in the details frequently. For the inquisitive, high-IQ CEO or president, it takes a certain level of self-control, and team reinforcement to prevent this from happening.

How can you determine the right involvement points for a C-level executive in your sales compensation design process? How do you ensure his or her engagement?

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe, email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com, or read What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation.

The Balancing Act

“All of America trusts us with their bugs, but we can’t get the right message through to our sales force,” the chief marketing and sales officer of a national pest control company recently mused. As an executive, he had cut his marketing teeth at many big consumer products companies. At his current company, he had worked for several years to improve sales productivity and had recently reached the level labeled “sales incentives” where he was charged with motivating the sales force. But there was a problem.

“For a long time we assumed we had a good sales incentive program. But we got all out of balance with profit and growth. We were rewarding for great profit margin, but poor growth,” he says.

President’s Club was a perfect example. Each year the company invites the top ten percent of sales people to President’s Club. It is part reward – usually a trip is involved – and part recognition as peers and upper management get a chance to congratulate the top performers.

But last year at President’s Club amid the festivities, he had already begun to play with measurement, and it wasn’t adding up. He looked at their branch level data and at the reps who were ranked at the top of the list. “What did we get from our top branches in the company? A lot of revenue, but zero growth.”

Zero growth.

“So the sales managers are running around wearing the fancy camel jackets that they just earned being the best branches, and they didn’t grow a single customer,” he says. “As a matter of fact, they actually had a net loss of customers because of intense competition. The only reason we kept our margins intact was the company had a pricing action, which was led by upper management and had no involvement from the branch level. They had lot of revenue at a high margin, but the bottom line was they had not grown the business.

“It was then we realized we had a real incentive alignment problem.”

Once this executive turned on the lights – in this case through measurement – the company could see the bugs in their sales compensation program begin to scatter.  By aligning the goals of the company – growing new customers – with the incentives for their sales team, the company could drive performance toward its goals.

He is one of the enlightened ones – a business leader who understands the connection between incentive pay and business goals and the power an effective incentive program can have. But too many senior executives worry about the cost without seeing the incredible return on their investment, if their strategic input is included.

How should the C-level get involved with sales compensation?

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

CEOs and Incentive Compensation – Partners or Strangers?

Do CEOs become involved in the design of incentive compensation programs, or just pop their head into a meeting and ask, “Will this cost me more or less than it did last year?” Are there advantages to either approach?

Somewhat surprisingly, in a lot of large companies we see CEOs or presidents that are very involved in the compensation design process.  It doesn’t mean that they’re getting down to the details of the process – modeling numbers and trying to be creative about SPIFFs.  What it means is that they are giving strategic direction and staying informed throughout the process. 

We recently worked with a large telecom company whose CEO is really involved in the sales compensation design process – for thousands of employees and a lot of different job types. It’s an important message for the CEO to communicate, and it’s a positive reinforcement to the sales and sales operations organizations that there is indeed a connection between the c-suite and the front line: incentive compensation.

In our experience, a C-level executive generally asks questions about how the business priorities are represented in the compensation plan.  One key question is: are the problems associated with the comp plans really compensation issues or are they broader sales effectiveness issues? Sales compensation kind of has a magical quality. It’s a tactical program that churns up more strategic issues. For example, a problem that may first be blamed on a poorly designed sales compensation plan might really be the fault of vague and uncertain job roles.  Sales compensation demands specifics, and because of that it can quickly identify other issues – kind of like a circuit breaker that pops. 

So how do you get the C-level involved?  Some CEOs are naturally involved, some are not.  Often the CEOs who came up the organization through sales have more engagement. CEOs with a background in finance might be more interested in the cost rather than the potential to incent behavior.

It’s worth consideration. Several years ago we designed a new sales compensation program for a manufacturing company. Right before we were supposed to interview the CEO, the project leader, who was the head of sales, stopped us and said, “I’ve got to tell you that the CEO doesn’t know why we need to meet.”  I couldn’t believe that the leader of this organization really didn’t understand the importance of the program.  We had the meeting, and about half way through the CEO got it. Ever since he’s been very deeply involved. 

The CEO connection is critical for the sales organization, in terms of strategic involvement. Whether it comes naturally or has to be coerced, it’s a worthwhile partnership.

Please visit SalesGlobe for more information or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Sales Roles – Is Simplicity Possible?

It seems like a simple concept – the role of a sales rep – especially when we apply straightforward labels like “hunter” or “farmer;” or our favorites, “Dobermans,” “Retrievers,” and “Collies” (actually, we go on to include Service Dogs, Pointers, and my personal favorite, the Mutt. That’s a topic for another blog). These labels distinctly describe what the role will do.

But as we all know, humans are complex and tend to defy such pigeonholing. So we go beyond the label and design territories and customer segments. Which methods of clarifying the sales role will increase productivity?

We recently worked with a company who had to take five different sales organizations they had acquired over time and create one functional sales organization. Within that entire sales function there were 35 different job titles. They took several steps to simplify.

 

1. Clarifying the Role. Everybody sort of approaches this a little differently.  This company, a major retailer, began with a certain role, clear responsibilities, and a job title. They made everybody very clear on what their operating objectives were.

2. Matching Products and Customers. Then they made sure each role had the right products for the right customers. There are customers in their business that are very sophisticated, and ones who aren’t at all. At the time, this company was trying to move their organization from a transactional sale – “You can have this for a buck” – to somebody selling conceptually by saying, “This is an annual merchandising program where we are going to sell millions of those bottles of water.” Not just that item for that price.

3. Match Talent to Customers.  Another priority of this company was to increase the quality of their sales organization. You don’t want to put the wrong person with the wrong customer; for example, you certainly don’t want to take a person with a Harvard MBA and assign them to a Mom & Pop store that only wants to deal with item and price. Instead, you’d place that person – most likely a person that has tools, perspective, and strategy – with major retailers, because he or she would create business solutions.

Selling is coming down to solutions. Simplifying the role, where possible, to focus on matching the right customer with the right products and the right talented sales rep – the ones that understand the customer – will create points of difference for your organization.

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

Sales Roles and Productivity II: Data-Driven Boosts

Information technology and business are becoming inextricably interwoven. I don’t think anybody can talk meaningfully about one without the talking about the other. — Bill Gates

So what drives productivity in your organization? Is it a matter of management making the sales process easy for the reps? Is it about financial incentives?

We recently worked with an office supply company that tried the information-based approach. Knowledge is power, and while too much data can be overwhelming, especially if it’s unorganized or seemingly irrelevant, specific, pertinent information can increase efficiency. Or so the theory goes.

This company decided to look at customer composition and tried to understand what each customer would buy by product category. Then, they looked at how far that customer had been penetrated by certain product and service segments. The idea was to focus the sales organization on the clear paths of penetration.  

They were able to capture all of the data relative to what the customer was consuming. They were able to see the product details for each customer bought in the paper category, they bought in print/copy category, and in furniture. “Then the game is to maintain the spend, improve it, and get them to spend in categories that they haven’t spent in before,” said the former executive vice president for the business solutions division.

“The overall approach l was to look at the customer and map out their remaining potential. And for those who are pretty well penetrated, assign them to a different sales resource. You have to make sure your data is kept fresh; it’s a reflection of where your customer is today, not where they were three years ago, because things change quickly,” she said.

How do you use information to increase productivity in your sales organization?

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

Sales Roles and Productivity I: Follow Me

 

Let’s acknowledge that different sales roles have different definitions of productivity. For example; the transactional sales rep selling local advertising with a quota of two sales per week will have a very different schedule than a long-term consultative sales rep selling an expensive piece of technology.

Different types of sellers, different characteristics to their productivity. Demanding a rep with a sales cycle of two years to close deals more quickly probably won’t result in more sales. More likely, it will annoy the potential customers and send your rep looking for another job.

So how can you define productivity in your organization and differentiate it between sales roles?

We worked with a company that recently made a change to build more of an account management focused organization because so many of their people concentrated on just hunting.

But they were in a new market, and both management and the reps were a little disoriented. So, in order to help the reps, the managers temporarily took over the selling. They broke the market, did the major hunting, and passed it along to the reps for account management.

“We said, ‘We’ll go find the customers, we’ll develop the pattern, how they buy, what the customer looks like, persona, cycle,’ everything,” said the vice president of marketing for the company. “And we’ll train the salesman. We will get the first order, we’ll teach you how to do the second order, and then you’re on your own for the third order.”

“We built a war room down on the first floor and started going through this whole process of building this together. The reps wanted to know what we were doing in there, and we said, ‘You focus on the day job. Don’t try to create this new market. Because then, you’ll lose focus, you won’t make quota, and we will go broke as a company.’

“So, we said, ‘We’ll teach you how to do this and add it to your portfolio.’

“There were questions like, ‘Will I lose quota? Will you take business from me?’ So, we had to work through all of those territorial things that we as sales people like to hold on to.”

It was an interesting concept. This company, a major technology company, didn’t put the salesperson out and say, “Go develop the business in this particular area.” They prepared it for them. They went through the process with them, and then repeated it, and let them catch on that way.

“We knew that the first time we were going to get our nose bloodied. We had to understand how the deal happened,” he said. “There were things we didn’t understand when we got started. Our sales guys got chewed up. We figured out what the pattern was, and learned that we had to develop it, and then hand it off to that organization.”

How well would a practice like that work in your organization?

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Using Customer Insight to Become More Productive

 

We all want to please our customers. But how many of us regularly ask them exactly what they want, versus assuming we know how to please them and proceed about our merry way?

Several years ago SalesGlobe hosted a panel discussion about selling to strategic accounts, and one panelist, who had sold to a major grocery chain for years, recalled the impact of hearing the following sentence:

“You know Tom, it’s great when you sell to us how you want to sell to us. But it’s even better when you sell to us how we want to buy.”

 Simple, yet transformative.

How do you evaluate customers and understand what they are looking for? The goal is to use customer information to become a more productive sales organization. How do you look at the market and where it’s headed for competitors? Are there ways of getting insider information that can improve business results, either in terms of the metrics we’re looking at or what we’re hearing back from customers?

Of course, the more we can partner with our customers the more we can drive productivity together. Partnerships and productivity gains are interwoven. At every front, to listen to the customer – logistics, processing, procurement, billing. Partnering in any way possible to create solutions together will improve our productivity and continue to provide great service. Opening up the entire organization from every functional expert to become more efficient for your customer will help you be successful together.

A client we worked with recently held a partner conference to better understand the needs of their customers. They gathered the CIOs of their top 13 customers into one city for two days. The goal was to listen to their customers and understand not only what the sales people are hearing the market, but why they’re hearing it.

Many companies get voice of the customer in pieces and parts, but we have to amass that information. Once amassed, analyze it for patterns and movements in terms of what we’re missing relative to customer expectations. Why are we losing deals and why are we winning deals?

What practical methods have you found for gathering customer insight and using it to drive productivity?

To learn more visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Sales Productivity Checklist

Sales productivity doesn’t exist in isolation. A sales organization can’t move forward (and in fact can spend lots of time moving in circles) unless its sales strategy, sales coverage model, and sales enablement methods are all well aligned. Before you start calling on customers, ensure the high-level picture is complete with the following checklist:

 1. Insight. The sales organization must understand what’s happening in the market, especially concerning their competitors and customers. Insight can be gathered through forensics on deals won or lost, and by analyzing what we might do better next time. This information is especially valuable if we uncover a pattern within the sales organization of not meeting customer needs or a gap between their expectations and our delivery.

 2. Sales capacity. Sales capacity refers to how efficient we are with the resources we have, and asks how we can maximize their capability through alignment, focus, and sales process. What are our job roles? One very effective method of increasing sales capacity is to decontaminate sales jobs and open up more sales time. Sales capacity is also improved through shifting and lifting jobs: moving some people to cover high priority customers with strategic selling while we ask other roles to focus on transactional selling.

 3. An actionable strategy. Sales strategy defines a clear plan for how the organization can achieve its sales goals. How do we convert our overall business strategy to the sales organization? How do we translate that strategy into day-to-day tactics, and help the reps understand what they’re supposed to do Monday morning when they go out and start  calling on customers? The most sophisticated strategy in the world won’t work unless it can function well on the front line.

 4. Account planning. Defining sales productivity also means understanding our actions that are counter-productive. It is not productive to spend a day (or several days) documenting facts, figures, and guesswork about customers and then shelving it for six months. Account plans that are not used in the daily or weekly management of customers are a waste of time. How can we turn our account plans into living account plans, and use them not only to record critical information but as a basis for coaching?

 5. Sales compensation. Incentive pay can certainly be used to motivate productivity in individuals. The opposite is true, too; people incented to do the wrong thing can lead to an unproductive sales organization as a best case scenario, all the way to a sales organization confidently charging in the wrong direction, as a worst case. Short term incentives including SPIFFs are another way to motivate productivity.

 6. Pipeline. Over the last few years, pipeline management has become much more efficient. This is in part due to the need for more effective lead management in a challenging environment and better application of CRM tools.

 Need help getting greater productivity from your sales organization? To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Managing a Multi-Generational Sales Force

For the first time in US history, four generations are working side by side, representing a 50-year age and experience span. On the upside, companies benefit from the range of experience and unique views those decades provide. On the downside, each generation has varying cultural and motivational expectations driving their work ethic and behavior.

You might find some of these defining characteristics in your sales organization:

  • The Traditionalist (born between 1927 and 1945). Punctual and conservative, he survived the Great Depression and a world war and believes hard work is its own reward.
  • The Baby Boomer (born between 1946 and 1964). Well-established, loyal and work-centric, he values face time in the office rather than work/life balance.
  • The Generation X-er (born between 1965 and early 1980s). Witnessed the burnout of his parents; hardworking and ambitious, he prefers to set his own hours and values freedom, autonomy, and family time.
  • The Generation Y-er (born in 1980 or later). Smart, creative, optimistic and tech-savvy, she is a multi-tasker who prefers technology over face-to-face interactions. Don’t waste her time making her come to your office.

The challenge is, of course, to aligning these generations toward a common sales goal; and  motivating and retaining talent in each of the generational groups to give your company a talent and performance edge. 

It’s important to start with some insight:

  • Understand who’s in your sales organization.
  • Recognize the factors that matter most when managing the generations.
  • Prevent traditionalist, authoritative management from wreaking havoc on Gen Y achievements.
  • Enable each generation in a larger sales strategy context.
  • Recruit and retain the talent that you need.
  • Set expectations and create effective incentives for each generation.
  • Understand how coaching and development can help the generations to work together.

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email Mark.Donnolo@SalesGlobe.com. 

That Thing Starbucks Does…

Sales is no longer just about the product. It’s about the entire customer experience. Consider how companies like Starbucks and Apple have differentiated their brands: it’s not just the coffee; it’s the personalized service and welcoming environment. It’s not just the computers; it’s the opportunity to schedule an appointment with a concierge to learn about the latest and coolest technology. These interactions didn’t happen accidentally – they have been designed in a highly creative way.

Your organization, by plan or by default, creates a customer experience. Your customers, in turn, respond to that experience with their loyalty (retention revenue), growth (penetration revenue), and referral of new customers (acquisition revenue).

Methods we’ve studied include evaluating the current experiences of your customers, and implementing creative ways to improve those interactions and differentiate your organization, and advancing customer connections from Interaction, to Engagement, to Relationship.

 

Important considerations include:

 

  • Customer experience within a larger sales strategy context.
  • Understanding how customers see your organization.
  • Understanding how your customers respond to the experiences you currently create.
  • Identifying all of your customer touch points.
  • Building a set of planned interactions across all of those touch points.
  • Leveraging the creative process to create a distinct and differentiating environment for your customers. 
  • Customer experience within a larger sales strategy context.
  • Customer behavior assessment  – Understanding how customers value your organization by how they behave.
  • Clue analysis – Identifying critical clues to indicate how you might improve.
  • Designing the right customer experience.
  • Building a set of planned interactions across your key touch points.
  • Creating a consistent experience across your sales organization.
  • Leveraging the creative process to create a distinct and differentiating environment for your customers. 

 

To learn more about creating a customer experience, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

 

Coaching the Coaches

 

Sales training and development can make or break an organization. Whether auditing your existing program or designing something from scratch, it doesn’t have to be hard. We recommend the following five key points:

1. Leadership must make the mandate for coaching clear. If coaching is not a priority in the organization, it will only be conducted by those who are interested. Many of the top performing sales organizations around the world require that their managers spend target amounts of time weekly on coaching. To ingrain the process in the organization some companies will go as far as requiring managers to post their coaching time on a public calendar, making it visible to the organization. Like most business priorities, coaching has to be viewed as essential by leadership in order for managers to make it a priority in their own jobs.

 

2. Build a coaching program and methodology that fits your organization. Using a standard coaching program – one off the shelf or one being used by another company – is certain to fail. A program that is a good fit for one organization may be a poor fit for your organization. Determine the priorities for your coaching program. Understand from a customer perspective where your weak points are and engage your leadership team in developing the right program for your business.

 3.      Decontaminate your management roles and your sales roles. One of the greatest robbers of coaching effectiveness is lack of time. Define the top three to four critical roles for your sales managers. Make coaching one of those critical roles and determine the amount of time managers should spend on coaching. Identify any other roles – good or bad – that managers play or tasks that managers conduct and perform a value-added analysis on those tasks. For low value tasks for the manager, either eliminate those tasks or shift them to the right resource to make time available for coaching. Conduct the same type of decontamination process for sales roles to increase their available time to sell. The average organization spends 50% of time selling. Identify your actual performance and set an achievable improvement objective.

 

4.      Lead ongoing deal level coaching with the team to challenge thinking. Take coaching down to the micro level, developing strategies for key customer pursuits. Use the sales pipeline as more than a review tool and leverage it for coaching. This can provide new accountability for pipeline management and challenge thinking around specific deals. It is also effective for collaboration between the sales rep and the sales manager so that coaching has a purpose and an objective: to close the deal.

 

5.      Make the process transparent and measurable, including deal forensics, win/loss analysis, and living account planning. What gets measured gets accomplished. If you are not measuring the effectiveness of your coaching program, you risk missing some significant returns. Key to transparency and measurement are tools that provide customer responsive information to coach with. Deal forensics or win/loss analysis looks at major lost deals from the customer perspective and why we lost them. It helps us identify areas for improvement that can be used for coaching the sales team and making strategy changes in the organization as a whole. Living account planning takes the stagnant account plan off the shelf and assigns a process and goals to working the account plan on a weekly basis. The living account plan can be used by managers as a coaching tool to set objectives, track reps according to attainment of those objectives, and coach them to improve their results.

 

For guidance or help on building your coaching program or coaching your managers and reps to a higher level of sales performance, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

It’s Good For You: Coaching and Development

Sales training and development can be a little bit like eating your vegetables. Or exercising. You know it’s the right thing to do, but the excuses are so easy and there’s never enough time.

But as the year kicks off there’s really no better way for sales organizations to achieve goals than through coaching.

It’s a critical role for sales managers. Despite its importance, however, it’s under-practiced in many organizations. Sales managers don’t coach for one of two reasons; they don’t have the time, or they don’t know how to do it. But balancing out the role between sales and sales management is crucial to allow bandwidth for coaching time, and setting priorities for sales managers is the first step.

Most companies realize how important sales coaching is. In a recent survey conducted by The Sales Leadership Forum, 84% of companies perceive coaching as either “very important” or “one of the most important factors of sales success” for their organizations. But are sales organizations really interested in doing the work? Surprisingly, although sales people often take a cynical view of training, most sales people are open-minded when it comes to coaching and development that contributes to their success. In fact, 75% of sales leaders see their organizations as receptive to coaching.

If coaching and development are important, what are the benefits? Many of these same companies (44%) aren’t clear on the benefits and don’t measure the effectiveness of their sales coaching programs. Of those who do measure the effectiveness of coaching, the top benefits they see from their coaching programs are:

  • ·         an increase in sales productivity per rep
  • ·         an increase in close rates
  • ·         an increase in their ability to cross sell or sell complex solutions or complex products
  • ·         an increase in revenue or profits.

 

In terms of ROI, about half of companies (48%) report that they get a return greater than their investment in coaching and development, or a return multiples greater than their investment. And an additional 32% of companies at least recover their costs from coaching. 

Companies report several challenges in measuring the return on investment in their coaching programs. For example, on the “investment” side of the ROI calculation, coaching in many organizations is conducted informally at the manager level and is not practiced consistently in the field. This makes it difficult to measure the actual resources, both hard and soft dollars, invested in coaching. Also, coaching is often blended with other management roles and not clearly tracked by the organization. 

On the “return” side of the ROI calculation, the outcome from coaching is not always clear or near-term. While productivity levels and close rates may appear to be clear metrics for coaching success, those metrics may be driven by other organization and market factors in addition to the coaching program. Improvements in sales capability can develop over time as well. For instance, learning more effective methods for developing the business case and value proposition for strategic accounts may yield results months later when those opportunities naturally present themselves over a long sales process. While the effect of coaching is there, its impact may be latent for some period of time.

How much should a sales manager focus on sales coaching? When we ask managers about how much time they spend on coaching versus other activities in their role, we often get a puzzled look as they think about their range of responsibilities. The fact is spending time on coaching is a challenge for most managers. From the sales executive perspective most leaders (63%) think their sales managers should spend between 30% and 40% of their time on coaching.

But the reality is most sales managers spend less than 20% of their time coaching. That statistic illustrates a gap of about 60% between how much time managers should spend coaching their organizations and how much time they’re actually spending. Such a large disparity may indicate that the message isn’t getting through from executives to managers.

That gap leads to the question of why managers spend so little time actually coaching. One of the biggest challenges we see in both sales management jobs and sales jobs is the time available to focus on their core responsibilities, whether they are selling or sales management. If coaching is a major priority for sales managers, then a premium portion of their time should be dedicated to coaching. That’s not the case. In fact, the top reason companies cite for sales managers not spending more time coaching their teams is they have other management responsibilities that take too much of their time.

A full 70% of companies say that sales managers are held back from coaching because they are too busy with other aspects of their job not always related to sales or sales management. A deeper look reveals that many of these responsibilities are administrative or operational in nature – responsibilities that do not have a direct impact on either revenue growth or development of the team that produces revenue.

 

Forty-seven percent of companies say that managers are not able to coach because other sales responsibilities take too much time. While more productive than administrative or operations activities, this indicates that many sales managers are actually selling rather than coaching. A clearly defined “selling sales manager” job may indeed have both management and selling responsibilities – a hybrid role used occasionally that is typically not as effective as a true sales manager. This allocation of sales manager time begs the question: What is the role of the sales manager? Is it managing or is it selling? High performing sales organizations understand that they gain a greater revenue impact from managers focused on coaching their teams to sell than from sales managers selling directly.

 

Time constraints can take another form. Forty percent of companies said that sales managers just do not make the time to effectively coach, meaning they are finding other things to do with their time. Perhaps they are even deliberately avoiding that ominous task.

 

We know from our research and our work  that a big part of coaching comes down to the priorities of the organization. About one in seven companies (14%) do not require their sales managers to do any kind of coaching or development. If coaching is not a requirement of the organization, other responsibilities – whether they are selling or administration – will always take the front seat.

 

Beyond time, the other top barriers are around knowledge and importance. Forty-four percent of companies said managers do not know how to coach effectively. Therefore, even if they are given the time they do not know what to do with that time. Another 19% said they do not have a methodology for managers to use when they have time to coach.

 

To learn more visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

Targeting & Segmenting Customers

A former vice president at a major office supply company recently talked to us about targeting and segmenting her customers for the sales organization.

Below is some of her wisdom and advice:

“We tried to help our sales people understand where they could get the best return. It was pretty scientific actually.   We found a way to design potential by customer size, by territory.  Really, it’s sitting down there, and it’s not glamorous.  It’s a lot of sweat equity as you figure out what the territories need to look like and then actually measuring people against that potential.  You get people who say, ‘My potential is not very good.’ Too bad.  You’ve got to get people to understand where you are going. Then they can change and you manage according to potential. 

 

We took a look at the geography, understood the customer that was set within that geography, understood what the buying habits were of the potential customer set within that group and then applied that to territory design. 

 

“It also spoke to organizational design because we had overlay organizations.  Everybody was a generalist and we had to determine what levels of productivity we could see improve with some specialization.  There was a need to get some specialization in the organization – – people who could hunt, people who could farm, education people, government people where buying cycles and purchasing patterns are unique and procurement policies are different. 

 

“But you can take that too far, and I think that’s what happened.  I would caution people to try to step back every once in a while and look at the whole forest, because those trees get in there and get you kind of confused sometimes. Eventually we knew we had gone too far. It happened over time. We got away from a sales operating perspective.  We didn’t keep a focus on ensuring that it remained clean and pure, so we ended up with all of these overlay organizations. People would tell me, ‘This is my sales territory and I’m the business development manager of this territory and, oh by the way, here’s my partner from the education sector, my partner from the government sector, my partner from copy and print, etc.’  There became so many segments that it became diluted. The cost of sales needed to be examined more closely than what it was.”

 

To learn more visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Every Customer Happy Every Time?

Once upon a time a woman went to work for a new company. As she walked around the halls she noticed posters everywhere that read “Every Customer Happy Every Time.”

 So she went to the CEO. “What’s with all of these posters?” she asked.

 “Aren’t they great?” said the CEO with a proud grin.

 “No,” said the woman. “Every customer is not a good customer. We have to take them down. We have to take them down now.”

 It’s a common misperception. Since we all want more customers, it’s natural to assume all customers are good customers and therefore we should do everything we can to make them happy. But it’s also a way to dig yourself into a losing situation.

 One way to prevent a relationship with a losing customer through targeting or segmentation.

 Targeting customers is a practical way to look at customers differently, and can help us to concentrate in some better places.  If we’re going to line our resources up in a place, how do you know where to put them?  It’s about understanding a new market and finding the right customers in that market.  The product or service you are offering is the same, but the customer’s needs might be different. Understand what that customer’s business problem is, how they’re thinking about the problem and how you can address it. 

Do you agree or disagree that “Every Customer Every Time” is a bad idea?

To learn more visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Communicating Change to a Sales Team

Perhaps the hardest aspect of business communications is the timing. You’re always behind the 8-ball. So much of communication is formally announcing what people already know thanks to the rumor mill and the water cooler.

 So there’s a natural pause. “Do I really need to announce to my sales team that we’re redesigning territories? They already know it.” But avoiding that formal announcement is a mistake: it’s a missed opportunity to frame the change in positive language and directly address the natural fears associated with change.

 Before you talk yourself out directly communicating to your sales team what to expect with their new sales comp plan or job roles, consider making time for an “assessment phase” to do the following:

1. Send a clear message from leadership making a compelling case for why change is necessary now.

2. Gather input from the people who will be most affected by the new sales comp plan or territory redesign (or other change) through formal or informal interviews and/or mini-surveys.

Whether rumors have begun flying about an expected change, or you’ve just noticed a few fearful glances around the office, beginning effective communication early will usually garner a greater percentage of buy-in from people who feel they’ve been heard.

 

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

The Revenue Roadmap

The Revenue Roadmap model is something that we put together after working with hundreds of companies and asking, “What is the difference between high performing sales organizations and the average (or lower than average) organizations?” It really comes down to four major competency areas: Insight, Sales Strategy, Customer Coverage, and Enablement. These four disciplines, and their relationship to each other, provide a context for any driver of sales effectiveness – especially compensation and quotas.

1. Insight: Insight refers to how much we know about what’s happening in our market and understanding what’s happening with our competitors and our customers. If we don’t have our finger on the pulse of the macro market, we can’t develop our strategies with any degree of precision.

2. Sales strategy is an action plan to achieve a sales goal. The strategy converts high level (often financial goals) down to the front line that we can take to market. So it involves the types of services and products that we’re going to offer, our customer segments and our target customers. We have to have a solid value proposition for those products and services that translates well into a message sales reps can take to the customer.

 

3. Customer coverage: Customer coverage refers to how we align to our customers in a very practical, tangible way. What types of sales channels are we using? Direct sales organizations or other types of third party channels outside the organization, such as resellers, distributors, or other partners that help us during the sales process. The sales roles and the structure define how our organization lines up to the customer. Are we using different types of account managers, and are they focused on different segments? Do we have major account managers? Do we have new business developers?

The sales process itself should simplify customer coverage by outlining how the organization moves from the generation of an opportunity through the close and implementation. (And one of the pitfalls of simplifying the sales process is putting too many parts of the process on one sales role.)

4. Enablement: Once we’ve answered all upstream questions – Insight, Strategy, and Coverage – we finally get to the level of enablement. Sales compensation, quotas, recruiting and development of people and all the other support programs live here. But none of these programs – or the people they were designed for – can succeed without a solid foundation of Insight, Strategy and Coverage.

 

To learn more visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Lead Busters Part II

This is the second in a two-part series. Read Part I here.

Sales pipelines bloated with low quality leads can throw off organization sales forecasts, inflate rep quotas, and lead to missed expectations. Poor lead qualification can also rob the organization of valuable sales headcount by misdirecting thousands of hours of sales time a year toward no-win opportunities. To improve lead qualification and enhance sales force effectiveness, high-performing sales organizations use some of these best practices.

Sell to the right location. Many sellers find out too late that they’re pursuing a lead from a non-buying location. For companies selling to major accounts with multiple buying points, one key is to correctly identify the roles each location plays in the decision. There are essentially three models that most strategic accounts use to make buying decisions that can be matched against each lead. First, headquarters makes a company-wide buying decision that is mandated to all locations, which suggests that most quality leads will reside at that level. Second, headquarters selects preferred vendors the local locations may use. Under this “hunting license” model, the successful sales organization may find a quality lead at both the headquarters and local levels. Third, headquarters allows local locations to make the full buying decision. In this case, the quality lead will reside with each location. Matching the lead location with the decision model identifies potential dead end leads.

Manage to the metrics. Most sales organizations have a wealth of information on past sales processes that can provide them with metrics to manage leads. Two key statistics, expected value and lead age, can act as effective lead management metrics to churn out low quality funnel fodder. Expected value is the product of the budgeted sale and the probably of the close, which, over a large number of accounts provides an accurate sales estimate. Lead age is the total number of days the lead has existed in the funnel. While these metrics are not new, their value is in using historical data on actual probabilities and actual average days to close by customer segment, to force out low quality leads. As a rule of thumb, leads that are one standard deviation older than the average days-to-close for that segment are subject to automatic review and those that are older than two standard deviations are removed from the funnel and forecast.

Build the business case for better lead management. Organizations that are effective at lead qualification and lead management typically drive the change by understanding the cost of their current practices. Sales leads are typically used as a basis for sales forecasts, especially monthly or quarterly forecast adjustments that are within the timeframe of a typical sales cycle. Poor lead qualification can directly affect company sales forecasts and result in visible gaps that create costly market and investor reactions. Just as costly are the direct SG&A dollars spent on low quality leads. For a typical sales force that spends 50% of its time selling with 10% of that spent on no-win leads, recapturing that low quality lead time through better qualification can add the equivalent of one new rep for every four currently employed. This equates to a 25% increase in sales capacity without adding headcount. This is a compelling case for making a systematic improvement to the organization’s lead management capability.

 

Before After
For each sales person: For the sales organization:
2,000 hours worked per year Recapturing 10% time or 200
hours per year per rep
x 50% selling time (10%
poor leads)
x 4 reps
1,000 hours selling time 800 hours or the equivalent
of one new rep’s sales capacity
800 hours quality leads
200 hours poor leads

 

Make lead busting a team practice. Critically managing leads as an individual seller can be a challenging process. Many companies find it more effective to instill a process of team lead busting in which sales teams share funnels on a regular basis and rigorously question top opportunities using basic qualification metrics. In addition to helping each rep objectively evaluate his funnel, the lead busting process often produces team ideas for moving key opportunities ahead.

Create a systemic process for managing leads throughout the organization and aggressively audit lead flow and lead quality. Making lead management an organization discipline can convert sales funnels and sales forecasts from works of fiction to reliable planning tools. Effective lead management can directly increase forecast accuracy, highlight weak points and redirect sales resource time toward productive high probability opportunities.

 

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Lead Busters: Building a Stronger Sales Funnel Part I

This is the first in a two-part series. Read Part II here.

Sales people are traditionally quantitative people. Give a rep a new compensation plan and, within five minutes, she’ll tell you how to earn the most with it. However, give a rep a sales funnel and she’ll become fogged by the same optimism that drives her. Most sales people find comfort in a full sales funnel. It looks good to management and creates a personal sense of abundant opportunity. However, funnels bloated with low quality leads can throw off organization sales forecasts, inflate rep quotas, and lead to missed expectations. Poor lead qualification can also rob the organization of valuable sales headcount by misdirecting thousands of hours of sales time a year toward no-win opportunities. To improve lead qualification and enhance sales force effectiveness, high-performing sales organizations use some of these best practices.

Start with rigorous targeting. A quality lead starts with a quality target customer. Since most leads are generated by sales and marketing, this puts the onus on them to select the most attractive customers or potential customers at the outset. The most effective method to select target leads is to translate the organization’s target customer segment definition to clear criteria that sales and marketing can act upon. This includes company characteristics, typical buyer titles, and attractive opportunity types. To test the effectiveness of your targeting, select a good sample of reps and match their target customer and prospect account lists with the company’s target segment definitions. Does the sales organization’s tactical action align with its strategic segment targeting? Do reps self-select their target accounts based on personal preference or comfort level? Targeting prospects that have a poor fit with the company’s objectives dramatically lowers the potential for quality leads.

Map the customer’s buying process. Knowing where the lead is within the customer’s organization can help the rep to improve or write-off the opportunity. It is essential to know the complete buying organization in terms of its decision-making process and criteria. Relationship sellers often rely too heavily on a single close contact to pull through a sale and therefore overrate lead quality. A good place to start is to understand how customers within certain target segments typically make their decisions by mapping the steps, players, criteria and interactions using a number of historic sales processes both won and lost. Consolidate these actual buying process maps and use them to test assumptions on the quality of specific live leads for the same customer segment. Knowing your true position helps you better qualify your opportunities.

 

Read Part II here. To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

Defenders of the Status Quo: Compensation and Culture II

This is the second in a two-part series. Read Part I here.

 

Every company has its defenders of culture who – for better or for worse – maintain the status quo. Close inspection of what these people are defending reveals the root values of the organization. The root values branch out across the company and manifest as various practices by each function, from sales to finance.

But culture is organic. It evolves. And sometimes you have to prune it back a bit to keep it in shape. Not surprisingly, changes to the sales compensation plan inevitably breed conflict.

In our work with companies, a few compensation challenges stand out:

1. Job roles. Conflict can arise from inconsistent definitions of job roles. A company we worked with recently said, “We want to put a new business developer role – an aggressive hunter role – in the organization.” But that was very contradictory to the service-oriented, account management culture they had encouraged for years. So there was a question of whether to move current people into those roles or bring in new people. Current people felt threatened and worried about a potential loss of income.

2. Paying top performers. Compensation issues such as pay mix and threshold present questions as well. An aggressive job role demands a certain pay mix and threshold, which might conflict with a moderate culture. Certainly if we have plans that provide less pay on the downside and more pay on the upside (so you’re paying a significant amount more to top performers) can conflict with a culture that’s accustomed to less disparity.

3. The timing and urgency of the plan. We recently worked with a company that has two different organizations. One is paid on bookings; the other is paid on billings. They have very dissimilar dynamics and very distinct cultures because of differences in the way they’re paid (they’re paid that way because of separate features in the business). The part of the company that uses bookings has more contracted revenue. So they can pay on bookings and the rep can move on to the next deal. With billings it’s not a hard contract, so it takes a while for that revenue to actually show itself. And the company wants the rep to be involved. It creates a very different level of urgency and a different level of account management. The selection of a mechanic or a measure like that can make a big difference in terms of how that aligns with culture.

4. Governance. When you make a change in the plan, how do you accomplish it within the company’s cultural tolerance for change? For example, if a company wants to put in a new customer selling role, or really make that a focus in the organization, how fast should we make that change? Is that something we can afford to do right away or should we do that over a period of steps in order to make it a little easier for the organization to handle that change?

Even though change is inevitable, every company has its defenders of the status quo. In fact, according to research, when implementing a cultural shift, 20% of the people will be change friendly, 50% will be fence-sitters but 30% will deliberately resist or try to make the change fail.

 

To learn more, visit  SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

Compensation and Culture: Subtle — and Strong — Powers

 

This is the first of a two-part series. Read Part II here.

A company’s culture and its sales compensation plan are related by one element: power. Both have the ability to dictate the direction, speed, and effectiveness of an organization. When we work with companies who want to dramatically change their sales compensation plans, we immediately look at their culture.

Consider these questions:

  • Is our organization closer to a Cisco or a Georgia Power?
  • Can our culture sustain change?
  • How difficult will this change be?
  • Do we encourage ideas from the front line or are we a top-down driven organization?
  • When was the last time we implemented a change in our compensation plan, and how well was it received? (Usually the longer the current comp plan has been in place, the more resistance the current culture will be to any changes in incentive pay.)

There are several factors to take into account when evaluating your culture:

1. Urgent versus laissez-faire. Company culture can affect the level of urgency. For example, sometimes an organization might say they want to step up the level of pressure in the sales organization; the leadership doesn’t feel people are really pushing. At one company people were taking vacations at the end of the year rather than trying to close business. The culture permitted lackadaisical behavior and lacked urgency.

2. Visionary vs. reactionary. Many organizations are trying to move toward a visionary culture; a more solutions-oriented culture versus a transactional culture. Most companies are familiar with the complementary/contradictory relationship of hunters and farmers and the differences in the culture they pose, in terms of how your sales organization is oriented.

3. Team-oriented versus individually-oriented. Some companies prefer people to collaborate, while others prefer each man for himself.

These factors act as a foundation when we begin to look at sales compensation. How a company defines culture offers important hints about the priorities of the business, which are the starting points for any well-designed sales compensation program.

 

To learn more visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

Sales Comp for Strategic Selling

Think about the strategic importance of a particular product or service. Usually, there’s at least one product or service that is strategically more important to sell than others. But sometimes these products or services are outside the comfort zone of the reps, for one reason or another. We often hear: “We’ve got these new products we want people to sell. They’re really important, but the reps aren’t selling them because they’re focused on the current stuff or the core products. How do we motivate behavior there?”

A lot of times, the answer is weighting. It could be literal weighting of a commission rate, or it could be weighting through linking measures together. But it’s basically like product bundling. It’s saying: we’ve got some really good stuff here that our customers are not buying or our reps aren’t selling, but then we’ve got the stuff the reps are all going after. How do we get them to sell more of the stuff we want the company to sell?

There are two variables to examine here. You could look at the strategic importance for the company – on a scale of unimportant to very important. Then you could look at the difficulty for the rep to sell that, or the attractiveness of the rep to sell that product or that service, on a scale of not difficult to very difficult.

So very simply, the middle would be selling something of average difficulty and average strategic importance. That, call it a commission rate, represents a one. So average difficulty, average strategic importance is a commission rate of one. But then as it gets more difficult for the rep and more strategically important for the company, that’s where you really start to weight things up.

Several years ago we worked with a directory company (similar to the yellow pages advertising business). For years they sold advertising for the big book that ends up on your doorstep. Then they came up with online advertising through Yahoo or YellowPages.com. And they said, “We want to sell more online advertising.” But there were problems. It’s a different sales cycle and the advertising goes up immediately; customers didn’t have to wait for the book to publish. The company liked that better because they get immediate revenue and more immediate advertising for the customer.

The company knew strategically that’s where they were going in the future. But the reps wouldn’t sell it because all the money was in the yellow page books. So the company asked: “How do we get them to do that?”

Weighting was one answer. We looked at the strategic importance and we started to weight up the online advertising. The company made an investment in that online advertising. They were paying more dollars in incentive for online sales than they were for the published directory sales. And what happened? It pushed the company in the right direction and set the course for the future.

Weighting offers one way of sorting out those strategic priorities.

To learn more, please visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

 

Gauging Greatness: Which Performance Measures are Worth Tracking?

 

You have the perfect sales strategy and some pretty awesome products. Now it’s time for  your sales organization to make the sales. But not just any sales, the right products to the right customers to make the company a lot of money.

The sales compensation plan is the perfect way to motivate the sales organization. And peformance measures can track success or failure. Less is more here. The fewer – and the smarter – your performance measures are, the more success the rep and the company will have with the compensation plan and the overall strategy of the business. There’s a whole swamp of possible performance measures, and it’s helpful to have a few basic structures to frame your thinking.

1. Financial measures are the most important. These are the bank measures, the things that you see on the income statement: revenue, sales, bookings, profit, income or even units, depending on what type of business you are. If you had a compensation plan that measured only one thing, you’d want to have financial measures because they produce results for the business.

2. Strategic measures are second in our hierarchy. They can steer the performance of the sales organization’s strategy. They say, “We want to sell more but we want to do it in certain ways.” We want to sell certain types of products, or we have a certain type of product mix. Or we want to sell to certain types of customers.  We want a certain contract length, so we want to sell more three- and five-year contracts than one-year contracts. Or, back to customer type. We want to do a better job of retention or managing our churn rate of current customer revenue.  Or we want to do more in terms of customer acquisition. We tend to live off of our current customer accounts.

Strategic measures say, “Sell more but do it in certain ways.” If I had space in a plan for two measures, I would want a financial measure and I want a strategic measure, and that would be it.

3. Leading indicator. Some sales organizations are in a really long sales cycle, and the reps may not actually see revenue for a period of time. Or, the organization has new business developers out there building a base that will take some time to evolve, but we can’t pay them on revenue because it doesn’t really exist yet. So what do you do there?

Some industries — for example automotive and semiconductors — use leading indicators in their plan. They’ll find customer recognized types of measures that they can put in the plan to lead up to revenue.

In the automotive industry they’ll use a bench prototype as a leading indicator. For an auto part components company, a bench prototype would mean the customer is interested enough to ask for a prototype; and they’re probably going to be buying from you. So that’s a leading indicator we might actually pay the rep for.

What are the best performance measures you’ve used?

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

The Creative Quotient Part II: Steps for Breaking the Boring Mold

This is the second in a two-part series. Read Part I here.

The philosophy of “We’ve always done it this way before” is way too popular for its own good, especially when it comes to account planning. The same stale plans, the same stagnant process, probably yield the same results.

What would happen if you injected some real creativity into your sales accounts?

Using innovation wins deals and helps the customer. Over several decades of working in both the sales effectiveness disciplines and creative disciplines with major corporations, we’ve learned that the Creative Quotient drives growth. The idea is to challenge a sales team’s thinking and then leverage their creative and quantitative sides to develop solutions that differentiate the company from competitors.

1. Define customer or sales challenge. Start by defining your specific sales challenge and your objectives for the outcome. A major staffing company we recently worked with (let’s call them Acme Resources) had a large prospective customer, a manufacturer that used a competitor to staff hundreds of light industrial personnel on its assembly lines. The customer’s challenges were that their temporary personnel had high turnover, the company had numerous safety violations, and the business had incurred high costs to continuously replace headcount. Stealing this account from the competitor would be a big win for Acme Resources but the competition was fierce.

2. Determine parameters. Each challenge has parameters for its solution. The most creative solutions come from within some limitations, rather than from complete freedom. For Acme, their parameters were the customer’s cost and resource limitations. For many sales teams, their immediate response would be to find a way to cut costs and price to win the sale – a sure path to a bad solution.

3. Create first generation approaches. With a clear challenge and parameters, we put the initial ideas on the table – the first generation approaches. These are the typical solutions. Acknowledge them, and put them aside. Although one of those ideas could be part of the answer, most will block our thinking. Acme’s team brainstormed its first generation list and cataloged it for future reference.

4. Destroy false assumptions. The next step is to destroy false assumptions. For the Acme team, their environment was full of assumptions, many based on “the way we’ve always done it.” Identify every assumption about how we address the challenge, rate their validity, and remove the ones that don’t hold absolutely true. Then question these true assumptions again as you move ahead.

5. Combine horizontal possibilities. This is where things get exciting. It’s been said that there are no new ideas. While this could be true (or a false assumption), an abundance of innovation today comes from combinations of ideas and applications of existing ideas to new challenges. One of Henry Ford’s innovations, the moving assembly line, was actually the improvement of an existing approach for a new business challenge. In sales, the application of existing technologies for telecommunications and the web has opened a new world of methods for working with customers, from telesales to social media for sales. Draw upon sources such as parallel examples from other businesses and industries, examples from history – even unrelated situations might spark new thinking.

6. Walk away (temporarily). After intense sales process innovation, briefly moving to other business will allow the team’s subconscious to digest this work and generate additional solutions. Ever wonder why your best ideas spontaneously come to mind in the shower?  It’s your subconscious at work, and it will produce the same results with sales process innovation.

7. Develop solutions vertically. With a range of horizontal possibilities developed, the Acme team scored each one and then developed the top three vertically. Vertical development entails going deep and building out the solution. Acme then took its top choices, tested them, and proposed them to the prospective customer. The solutions included new methods for forecasting attendance, gaining feedback from temporary workers, improving the work environment, and enhancing safety processes that would reduce turnover
and costs.

It might seem like a lot of work, but while Acme employed its Creative Quotient process its competitors proposed lower rates in an attempt to “buy the business.” For its hard fought sales process innovation, Acme won the business, and earned a place as a partner who crafted a new solution for the customer rather than a supplier who facilitated a historic problem. Acme applied the Creative Quotient to unleash its sales team’s power.

To learn more, visit  SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

People and Politics of Sales Compensation II

This is the second in a two-part series. Read Part I here.

While the group of folks charged with designing a sales compensation plan can put the “fun” in dysfunction, the group can also work beautifully together. After all, they share a common goal — to create a comp plan than harnesses all that power behind the sales force, and make everyone some money.

Consider your current mix of people and the following key points when creating the sales compensation design team.

1. Listen to the sales organization. As participants in the plan, this group can offer insight into how well the plan works, as well as any challenges. Interview sales managers, survey front line sales reps and be receptive to feedback throughout the year.

2. Include a cross-section of leadership in the planning and design process. Leaders from the major functions involved with sales and sales compensation should be
included during when making major decisions. Involving executives from sales leadership, financial leadership, administration leadership and human resources leadership ensures each organization has a voice at the table.

3. Follow a design guide and establish a decision making procedure. A design guide outlines the process – soup to nuts – of evaluating and creating a sales compensation plan that is aligned to the goals of the business. A guide keeps people on track and focused on the strategic goals of the plan, and prevents individual functions from getting sidetracked by a separate agenda. Make sure the guide outlines how decisions will be made within the group to prevent disagreements from becoming stalemates.

4. Gauge and then respect your CEO’s level of interest in the design process. While some CEOs like to be involved as the compensation plan is designed, others just like to hear the final number.

We’d love to hear who is involved in your organization’s sales comp design team and how it works — or doesn’t.

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

 

The People and Politics of Sales Compensation

This is the first in a two-part series. Read Part II here.

The people and the politics of sales compensation is about the softer side of sales compensation – who’s behind the scenes collaborating (or not); the steps in the process; how well the process works; how people work together; commonalities between the various functions involved; and solutions for challenges.

The human element touches sales compensation throughout the entire process. It happens during the year – asking sales managers to participate in the plan and convey how the plan is working; asking sales operations and HR to communicate and evaluate the plan. The human element assembles the compensation design team and establishes the principles for how the team will make decisions – who will crunch the numbers; who will evaluate the finished product and finalize the compensation plan. The human element determines the variety of perspectives included to make sure there is a well-rounded representation from the company. How they interact keeps it interesting.

Here are a few of the usual suspects:

1. The C-Suite. The C-level is almost always involved to some degree. Very often we see the C-level person – perhaps the CEO – pop his head in the room to ask, “Is this going to cost me the same or less than it did last year?” Other times we’ll have CEOs actually at the table and involved in the process. CEOs have very different levels of involvement in the compensation process, ultimately because CEOS, based on their personal preferences, have different degrees of comfort with sales compensation.

2.  Sales. Sales, obviously, is at the table, and they’re always asking for something (more money) often in the form of a bigger accelerator. They may grumble that HR doesn’t understand sales or what sales needs.

3. Sales Operations. Sales operations sometimes drives the process and other times responds to the process by trying to keep meetings organized and trying to devise a system that makes sense. Depending on where sales operations resides in the organization, these people can have different points of view. Sales ops most typically will be within the sales organization, but sometimes will be within finance or even HR. Where they sit, very often, determines their point of view.

4. Finance. Finance is typically at the table, either at the C-level or someone on the project team. They have an Interesting negotiating position. This perspective often brings some old cliché’s about sales: sales is overpaid; they have no value. Finance wants to negotiate: “If we have an accelerator on the plan, what are we going to take away on the downside so we can pay for the accelerator?”

5. Human Resources. Very often HR drives the process; and if they’re not driving the process they are certainly a partner. Their role is to looking at what’s happening in the market and make sure everybody is aligned with the market; try to bring some discipline to the process; and offer some expertise if that doesn’t reside on the team already.

6. Marketing. Marketing is not always involved in sales compensation, but sometimes they have an agenda, like sales. In a multiproduct or multiservice organization sometimes marketing tries to get a lever in the plan for each of the different products they represent, which can add complexity to the plan.

While all these interactions take place designing the compensation plan, the field sits and waits, knowing they will most likely get a bigger quota – often for a lower percentage increase in compensation. The sales compensation design process brings together many competing points of view and potentially competing priorities. It quickly, as we say, puts the “fun” in “dysfunction” in organizations.

Who are the people involved in your sales compensation design?

To learn more, visit  SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

 

Strategy and Sales Comp Part II: Putting it in Action

With all the power sales compensation can wield, it pays to invest the time to connect sales comp with the strategy of the business. Below is the second installment of nine important factors to consider when designing a sales comp plan that will drive more revenue. Read the first five in Strategy and Sales Comp Part 1: Making the Connection.

4. Reduce the complexity of the sales compensation plan. Often, the more technical an organization is – or the more engineering-oriented an organization is – the more complex the sales compensation plans will be. There’s a temptation to include everything even remotely important in the compensation plan. The key, however, is to include the two or three things that are most important to maintain clarity of message.

5. Manage the crediting and compensation costsMake sure you’re crediting the appropriate amount to people involved in the sales process without over-crediting. It’s a balance. We don’t want a single credit in a team sale or a complex sales process, nor do we want to over-credit. If you have too few credits people run to the opportunity and then run away very quickly once they realize somebody else has grabbed the credit. If you give too many credits, too many people belly up to the chuck wagon, and it motivates the wrong behaviors.

6. Increase sales productivity. The right daily actions of a sales person increase the overall activity of the organization. Sales compensation can be a powerful tool to motivate the right actions. Use sales compensation as a lever to drive productivity and to create the right motivations in the organization.

7. Control channel conflict.
In a multichannel environment with a direct sales organization and indirect channels, getting those resources to align to the customer is essential for success. Get these parties to work together without competing with each other or degrading your value proposition in front of the customer.

8.  Build a sales culture. The sales culture is an unspoken but powerful force in the organization. But assessing it is fairly subjective. A lot of organizations will say, “We’re over the top in sales culture.” Others will say, “We need to move in the direction of being sales-oriented but we don’t want to destroy the culture that we have. That’s very important to us.” As you make changes in sales programs and sales compensation programs, ask how those changes are going to support the culture. Also question the degree of change the organization can handle to make sure that we don’t push it in the wrong direction.

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Moving the Mighty Middle

Take a look at the quota results in your organization. Chances are you have a handful of reps that knock their quotas out of the park. You probably have another handful of people that can never seem to reach it.

But by and large, I bet the largest group hovers just below quota – making 80%-99% instead.  Close, so close, but they’re not making it.

While many organizations invest their effort in developing the high performers, there are huge gains to be made by improving the performance of the mighty middle of the organization. Moving them even a few incremental percentage points can have a larger impact on the results of the business than even a dramatic percentage gain from the high performers.

Short-term performance targets and a look at the motivators in the plan can be used to coax this group 5% closer to quota attainment, and that can deliver a much-needed impact on your business. For example, a high tech company we worked with recently realized it was actually de-motivating its reps for selling one-time deals if they were below 90% of quota. The reward was too small compared to the effort. In addition, the rep would essentially be punished the following year with a higher quota. It was better for the rep to wait until the new year to close the sale. It was a lost opportunity for the business and the rep. Simple changes in mechanics and policies made these opportunities much more attractive for the mighty middle and aligned their motivations more closely with the company’s goals.

Many companies find it difficult to separate high performance from high potential, and tend to over-focus on what they perceive to be their top performers.

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

The Deal You Can’t Afford to Lose

Maybe your rep just got lucky. She landed an appointment with the CEO of one of your major customers. She had what it takes to get in the door. Now does she have what it takes to close the deal?

Positioning at the C-level in your customer can get your business the visibility and consideration you might not otherwise get. It can differentiate you enough to land the deal you can’t afford to lose while your competitors are scrapping at the middle management level or better yet, negotiating with the procurement department. Develop a sales strategy that aligns to these senior level buyers, which includes understanding what their business issues are and the type of value and messages we need to communicate to capture their attention. One of the biggest complaints CEOs cite is that sellers don’t understand the customer’s business and, more specifically, don’t understand what’s really on the CEO’s mind. Provide meaningful input that addresses how the CEO looks at the business. Talking about product features and benefits to a C-level buyer usually misses the mark. Understanding the concerns of that C-level buyer and where they intersect your offering is a key to successfully navigating the C-suite.

Your organization must also be structured and designed effectively for C-suite selling. Specific sales roles such as major account management, supplemented by experts in the company’s products and applications can combine to provide a business oriented solution with the depth to deliver.

Look at your current inventory of talent and how their capabilities match up to working at the senior level of the customer.

  • Do they have the executive presence to roam the thick carpets of the C-suite?
  • Can they think like the C-level buyer and understand what’s important, or are they simply focused on offering your company’s products?
  • Do they have the creative capability to take your company’s products and meld them with an offering that matches needs of the C-suite?

Some critical points to know about C-suite selling:

1. The referral your account manager received to the senior buyer is perishable. It literally lasts minutes into the first sales call. He or she must be able to convert that reference to credibility very quickly.

2. C-suite buyers need to recognize that your seller knows what’s important to them; your seller understands their business; your seller can develop solutions that will address their needs; and your seller will be effective and efficient with their time, which is a valuable commodity.

3. While relationships matter, they have to be robust, not shallow. More contact time doesn’t necessary mean a better relationship with a CEO. Less contact time and higher impact equals a higher value relationship.

Once you’ve established the relationship and proven to be a valuable partner, the C-level relationship, well-cultivated, can provide an ongoing advantage in your major customers.

 

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email Mark Donnolo at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

Recruiting and Retaining Sales Talent Part II

From SalesGlobe Forum
Held in Dallas on 11/6/09

This is the second in a two-part series. To read Part I click here.

SGF Member: One of the things we struggle with is, unlike someone who sells a product, we sell a service. Attracting the right people who know how to sell a service versus a product is very difficult. So I’d be interested in feedback, and what processes they’ve gone through to find that type of person.

We’re finding difficulty in finding sales people that have that aptitude to sell it. Is that something you can see on the front end? Do you have a process to pick up on a person’s competency to sell a solution, or beyond the product?

SGF Member: We spend a lot on the profiling, but for the most part, you’re still trying to get the right skills and profile for that person to be long-term successful.

SGF Member: A really interesting concept in the business or consulting industry is to take a person who is really an expert in what we do, and based on that, maybe they can sell. They are a consultant, they start as a specialist or a practitioner. Because they can’t sell consulting unless they really know how to do it.

But the dilemma is interesting. Your grow people up and you say, “Ok, now you’re a partner. You’ve got to sell it.” And suddenly he can’t sell. You’re moving people from expert to seller. And here we’re talking about: how do we take an expert and make them a seller?

SGF Member: See, for us the challenge is to find someone who is operational on the client side, who is part farmer and part hunter. Pretty simple. We do it the exact same way. They understand the breadth of it, and then you maybe help form the growth from a client relationship side.

And then, on the sales side, they’re purely hunters. Their job is to go in, understand the unmet needs of the clients, and see if there’s something our organization can do for them. Then convince them at a very senior level to do that, and then be willing to divorce themselves from it, with no emotional tie: “Charles, it’s nice doing business with you. I’m going to hook you up to Simon. He’s your client relationship manager, he’ll love you. See you later.”  So that I can focus on sales.

The challenge is finding that individual. We’ve done a great job at integration, handing it off so it’s seamless, and the client really feels engaged. What we struggle with is finding that person to do the job Simon would do. I’m not going to say it’s an easier job, to find those types of people that go out and have the grit to sell a service.

I’m wondering how others have dealt with that themselves.

SGF Member: The one thing that’s difficult is you’re not hiring entry-level sales people in that kind of job. You can have a fine track record of success in selling services: you just have to tell them what’s unique about your services versus what they’ve sold in the past. I also think you can’t hire them en mass. This is where search firms and networking come in, to hire them one at a time.

But I think you have to look at a track record of success at selling services. I don’t think you can take a product person and make him a service sales person.

SGF Member: I would agree. At my company I didn’t know anyone who made the transition from applications to the services side. We did have some people who came from the services side who made the transition to the applications side, but they had the credibility to back them up.

SGF Member: So what I’ve done is, I take a look at the most successful profile. And my business developer officer and I try to match that up. It’s difficult. You need a combination of skills. The ones that are very successful have to have the credibility, so they have to have the knowledge, the terminology, the experience.

SGF Member: We have a very solid team today, 94 people. But finding those people, you make a lot of missteps. You use a lot of recruiting firms. It’s been a challenge. So we’re very patient in the process.

SGF Member: Is there any other process? Any other way to adapt or to speed up the process? Are you able to test drive them?

SGF Member: Well not necessarily test drive them, but we talked about psychology – people, psychology and the process really then allows you to test all three of those before you ever make that hiring decision. In a 30-60 minute interview you really can’t take that much away. You really want to spend three to four hours getting these guys together and see what they would do, long term.

You can take a page from consulting – running through the pieces of what you’d want them to do. Or put them in a job, and see them in action. That’s one of the things with sales people is, they’re sales people. They’re really good in a short period of time. They’re really convincing. You get them and really see how they are in time.

This is the hardest. I got fooled many times.

SGF Member: I am a big fan of case interviews. I like to hear cases of them on a job because that’s how you really hear things. Give them a period of time. See how they deal with situations selling to you what you need. When we used to hire applications sales folks, we used to have a 95 percent success rate.

SGF Member: Is it unchartered that you can do that?

SGF Member: Nobody in our space approaches businesses like we do. So that’s great. We like that. We like unchartered. But it’s strange. We worked with a couple headhunters, and when you look at these people, at their credentials – they’re awesome. So I went before anyone else met them, and I asked a couple questions. And they said they were really good in this particular space. I don’t want a box.

So you get people who –  maybe you run into this –  if they were acceptable in their environments, they would die in another environment.

SGF Member: So are you having trouble finding the right candidates, or are the ones you’re finding not performing?

SGF Member: Well form follows function on that. I’m through with the other piece of that. It costs a lot of money to bring people on, it costs a lot of money to train them, it costs a lot of money for that entire process. If they don’t develop to the level of some of your expectations…

I’ve hired some great candidates, but the company hasn’t put them in the right position. Classic sales guy here, but guess what the company spend $5 million last year and they’re not going to buy anything for the next two years. We’ve got a great guy on the account – he’s a great guy. He didn’t suddenly forget how to sell. So you’ve got those issues.

SGF Member: So I’m asking, do you have the right candidates, and are you doing the right things for them, putting them in the right position, to be successful?

SGF Member: I want to go back and make sure I answer that properly. I think it’s a little bit of both, but more times than not it is people in the environment that’s nearest or exactly like other environments, and they’re just not having the same level of productivity.

SGF Member: I think I made my errors in that. I got in this trap: I was going out to hire sales people, and that’s what I should have been hiring. It was a large complex sales organization. The sales people didn’t develop relationships with the customer. They were more used to a lot of environments. They weren’t as successful with the longer term, ongoing relationship with the client. And so I brought in a relationship management.

I learned there are more differences there than commonalities. You don’t have to get an account manager for this customer, but it’s another filter. And looking at this candidate, if they have this kind of relationship.

In our organization that kind of relationship guy, that’s how we separate those components. Because if it’s a client you’re already engaged with and doing business with, you just trying to nurture, grow and develop that relationship.

For a client manager, put that person in front of clients that you trust. Ask your clients, “How would you feel about doing business with this person, versus your original contact?”

SGF Member: I like that trusted customer relationship.

SGF Member: I like that idea. Throwing someone new out there?

SGF Member: That doesn’t have to be the customer that guy services.

MARK DONNOLO: Ok, any other points to bring up?

SGF Member: I don’t know if you guys have exposure to this or not, but our company uses the Gallup Poll exclusively, for psychological profiles and things like that, hiring sales people across the business.

When we start a new division we go to Gallup and say, “We want these characteristics for a communications rep.” Or you can probably call Gallup and create a profile, and say, “We want these characteristics profiled.”

For us, that’s the first step: put them through the interview process. But if they don’t score well on the Gallup, they don’t move on. If they do score poorly in some areas, at least we know where. If they have vision, or know how to build a relationship, at least we know where to dig deep.

It was discussed earlier: some of those tools, when we start a new division, it’s very helpful. We know what we want in a sales person and we know the characteristics that need to be there.

SGF Member: So you’re using a good filter then to increase the probability that you’ll have a good candidate.

SGF Member: Yes, for people who work in our business units who are going to have to go in and sit down to talk to Mr. Chairman and CEO of PepsiCo or Walmart or Walgreens.

SGF Member: Can they design a profile for that as well? They can? Excellent.

SGF Member: I’m a big fan of psychological profiling; I’ve taken a half a dozen. And I’ve been impressed. I took this 30 minute test and you nailed me. I mean it was really telling. And it’s good for the candidate as well, just as it’s good for the company. Because it makes sure you get somebody that’s a good fit for them as well.

I spent the last few weeks looking at this thing. And what I liked about this approach as opposed to the Gallup plan is they analyze the top-middle, and they build a profile for your company versus a generic, this is a hunter, farmer, whatever it is. And then the system kicks out a set of interview questions, based on those questionable areas where they don’t fit.

So those people in the remote stores or wherever it is, so that’s actually a good guide. It’s kind of interesting, and seems like it’s taking us to the next level.

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email Mark Donnolo at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

Recruiting and Retaining Sales Talent

From The SalesGlobe Forum
Held in Atlanta on 11/13/09

MARK DONNOLO: In this current economic climate, it’s a good time to recruit or upgrade your sales talent; to get rid of your bottom performers and actually bring in, ideally, a top ten percent. How you systematize an approach and adjust the compensation for those coming in? The top performers are leaving their company. They’re unhappy, so you have a chance to get them, but there’s a dollar figure hanging over the head.

Has anybody had any luck with a program or a system for that?

SGF Member: That’s a pertinent question for our organization. There’s a lot of available talent, and if you’ve got an attractive environment for winning sales people, true pros, you want to get them. It’s also a time to call underperformers.

We racked our brains because we don’t have the most lucrative compensation package. But we’re post-acquisition, and there’s always an integration budget that’s really nice and flush. And you have to have a good idea of how you’re going to use those dollars. So we’ve considered formalizing this “upgraded talent” and creating a sales bullpen. And, in order to have people come in that are attractive to your business, based on their historical performance and what they’re going to do for you going forward, we have used some integration dollars to formalize this upgraded talent and create a sales bullpen.

And I’m not sure if this is going to be successful or not. It was a great idea, because you’re talking about affording good sales people. So, once we create this bullpen and recruit the best talent, they would be joining the organization to bring new talent and bring the organization to a new level. But they wouldn’t be placed in roles right away. You’d have your own sales team seeing this unfold and probably raise their own performance. So, hold them in a bullpen and try to place them quickly, and use integration dollars to afford good sales people.

SGF Member: Definitely in today’s environment – in the macro economic situation – there’s tremendous talent out there. The talent I see out there is the talent that’s still with companies, not having left, because usually they’re the ones companies are trying to hold on to.

When someone asked, “How do you get rid of the lower ten percent?” I look at it somewhat different. I’ve inherited a highly tenured sales force – people who have been around for a long time. One of the fallacies is trying to look at how their performance has been over the years. The lower ten percent may not be the people who have had the worst results.

The change-out might be needed of people who have consistently hit their numbers. And the reason for that is you’ve got to look at the skills that they have and how they got there. And sometimes the reason they are where they are is they have the right customers. And what they’re bringing in every year, you might want to get double. Look at the existing team. It’s not just about who’s got the numbers and who hasn’t.

But the flip side is: when you’re looking at bringing someone in, the first thing I tell the HR people is, forget about this benchmark data you have. If you go after eight players it’s just like acquiring a company. They’ve got their own profit and loss statement. So first, what are your expectations out of some of the people you’re bringing in? If their compensation expectations are high, then the return you expect from them should be high as well. And when you get top talent like that, they don’t mind when you set the bar high.

SGF Member: For adding top talent to the organization, we look at people within our organization that are top talent. Because if I bring people from outside at income levels that are significantly higher, I put my top talent internally at risk. I’d rather cut more than the lower 10 percent because I think I’ll get more out of the higher performers than I would …

SGF Member: If you look at deals won over last few years – significant deals – and you look at the 80/20 rule, does it follow what you’re saying? That the top performers are bringing in 80 percent of your revenue, not 80 percent of your deals but 80 percent of you revenue?

SGF Member: Yes. And you know those people are your go-to people on everything.

SGF Member: So you’re loving on them more than usual right now because you don’t want them to look around or get discouraged.

SGF Member: That’s right. And to the question you had about the executive team who doesn’t love paying sales people a lot of money. We actually are led by a CEO who came up through sales, but I think some people say, “Well that’s a lot of money to make, I didn’t make that when I …”

But I say, “Well it may be different today.” We are pushing that envelope really hard. I think I’m putting a lot of personal reputation on the line, for that, because I think that is the way to transform our sales organization. The investment in the sales people will be required to change our company. But it’s scary, because you have to pay a lot more than people are used to.

SGF Member: Just yesterday I had a conversation with my CFO, and said this person is way out of line. We got through the conversation and bumped him up $40,000 in total compensation – some salary and some variables. You absolutely have to reinvest in your folks. You have to be continually recruiting your folks.

You made a great point about another company. I spent a lot of time talking to another company before making my decision, and I had an option to potentially join them. They were dangling those $800,000 – $1 million compensation packages in front of me. But they were 2008 figures. So I said, “Show me the 2009 figures,” and that dog’s not hunting in 2009.

So I think from the recruiting standpoint, from your perspective, it’s about, “Where’s the puck going?” A lot of people have had great years, and they are looking at W2 statements for 2009 and asking if they’re at the right place.

Everyone’s asking that. Everyone’s sales compensation is coming down. There is a great opportunity. And everyone’s open. And if there’s a compelling story to where your company is going, and what the upside is – no caps, a big market opportunity – if you’re as good as you say you are, the sky’s the limit. So I think I’ve seen a market that’s extremely receptive.

SGF Member: Just a quick question if you find this in your experience. Your top performers – it doesn’t matter what you pay them, they are workaholics. They’re going to give it all to you no matter what. Why not take care of them and love on them and appreciate them, those top performers. Are you finding that to be true?

SGF Member: I paid our top twice as much this year. Because I paid them for the responsibility that they were shouldering. Like you said, they work so hard, they contribute to every deal, they’re helping sales people in other territories. So I started giving them money. I had sales people that made $200,000 more this year than they did last year. And nobody can believe that. But we’ve had a phenomenal year on the backs of a few.

SGF Member: I have one question about an issue I’m facing in my company.

I have a tenured sales force, and our focus is clearly on business development. I’ve emphasized a key account owner; I want these people to feel they own the account. The challenge I have is focusing on business development and account ownership. A lot of time my sellers are in involved in service delivery and problem resolution. But there needs to be more focus on business development.

I see two questions. One, how do you deal with that with the seller? I’m trying to get that emphasis on new business development and not so much on service delivery. And the other question is, how do you get the other folks in the organization that are responsible for service delivery to step up to the plate and do that? Because right now, it gravitates to the seller.

SGF Member: This is absolutely something I see this time and time again. I’m responsible for service delivery and sales. When I came in I said, “You know what? The services delivery element is as important in terms of the ongoing sales as anything.” So we changed our model to show that. Then, when I look at that, there’s a couple of things:

Whoever is leading the service delivery side, if your sales people are spending that much time on service delivery, you have the wrong person leading the charge. The person has to basically tell the sales guys to get out of the way. It has to be that brutal. Now what you’re going to find, there are going to be sales people who choose not to get out of the way. They’re not the right sales person. I mean, yes, a sales person cannot ignore the fact the customer has an issue, but he’s got to facilitate to get the right people involved, not be the person. Once you’re in that position, you’re always in that position. You can never get out of it. So, it’s a combination of the two. The answer, in my experience, is you have to have the right person leading charge on service delivery end.

SGF Member: We actually have a hard line of demarcation between sales and delivery, and there’s an account manager – really a project manager – who takes over.

And there are hunters and farmers, and they look very different. You will get the deal closed and at the 60 percent sales stage we’re going to introduce the professional services team. We’re going to say, “This guy right here will manage the entire delivery process. Bottom line accountability, here’s his home phone number.” The sales person will delegate that.

Where I’ve seen that not work in my previous career is when there’s not a clear delineation between roles and responsibilities. I’ve seen sales people gravitate towards that. Because cold calling and business development, that’s the harder part of the job. So one piece is structure. And then the second piece is stack ranking – pipelines. And peer pressure from a continuous track record. Stack ranking to me has been one of the best performance management tools in my career.

SGF Member: When you talk about the delineation, how does the customer like that?

SGF Member: Well, I’m 45 days into it. One of my observations is that we break a relationship a little, and that’s not ideal there. But the point still remains the same, and that is there is a role in the company that that person is solely responsible for.

SGF Member: I buy into that. Let the hunter be the hunter and cut them loose. It’s always soft. We’ve adopted this thing where the person that takes the account, they go in there, and then the hunter leaves, but doesn’t leave for first six months. We make sure there’s a transition and a time period.

SGF Member: That’s a big key – that relationship and the expectations with the client. But the sales person should be out looking for revenue. You remember the NRGAs – the non revenue-generating activities. You don’t want your hunters involved in those.

The NRGAs is a big topic with us right now, and also they’re hard to do business with. I formalized it. We’ll see how effective it is, but we formalized it as a pinnacle issue. We’ve got sales people doing what we’ve not hired them to do, and we need to stop that. So we’ve got an executive sponsor on the non revenue-generating activities that are contaminating their performance. We’re trying to shift that to someone who’s got the pull in the organization to make it happen, and trying to cut sales people loose.

To learn more about recruiting and retaining top sales talent, visit SalesGlobe or contact Mark Donnolo at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com.

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