The Sales Compensation Diamond Part 2: Linking Pay and Performance

Sales Comp Diamond

This is the second in a three-part series of The Sales Compensation Diamond – evaluating and designing a best-in-class sales compensation program. Click here for Part I: Framing the Plan.

Linking pay and performance actually begins with performance thresholds, which we covered last week. The next step is to develop the measures.

  1. Develop Measures and Priorities

Performance measures define the focus areas that are most important for each role. Each measure should represent the most significant pieces of the sales strategy that the role can control. A challenge for many organizations is determining which few of many possible measures should be included in the sales compensation plan, which should be part of the performance management program, and which should simply be core expectations of that job. Do the measures represent the top two or three financial and strategic priorities for each job? Has the message of the plan been diluted with too many measures, creating a buffet plan from which reps can pick and choose? Do reps have significant control over each measure in their plans?

  1. Set Levels and Timing

            For each measure, the organization must define the level at which that measure will be tracked for the plan. For example the organization may define a revenue measure for a sales rep at an individual level or a region level. Each measure will also be measured and paid on a certain timeframe, for example monthly or quarterly. The decisions around measurement levels and timing can have a direct impact on rep behavior. Measure too high and the rep may have little control. Measure too frequently and the cycle may be out of synch with a long sales process. Do our measurement levels match with reps’ ability to impact those measures? Does the frequency of our measurement and payment match the rhythm of the sales cycle or it unnaturally speeding or slowing the cycle?

  1. Design Mechanics

Mechanics create the connection between performance and pay. It’s the area most sales executives will jump to first rather than working through the previous steps. If your team is starting here, then they’ve missed half the process. While mechanics can seem complex with various rates, hurdles, gates, accelerators, and point systems, they can be divided into three types. A rate-based mechanic (also known as a commission) usually pays a certain percentage of revenue or gross profit, or a certain dollar amount per unit of sale. A quota-based mechanic typically pays a target incentive for reaching a specific quota or goal and may scale its payout above and below that performance level. A link creates a relationship and interdependency between two measures or mechanics. For example, attainment of a goal for a product mix measure may result in a multiplier that links and magnifies the payout of a total revenue commission. Are the plan mechanics easy to understand and calculate? Do they create an alignment to goal attainment or can a rep simply earn to a level where she’s comfortable? Are old commission rate structures causing the organization to work backwards by structuring territories (an upstream discipline) to manage pay levels (a downstream discipline)?

  1. Align the Team

            A full sales compensation program will include a range of sales, sales support, and management roles. To work together as a team, plan designs must interface as a complete system. This alignment point checks for how sellers will work together as teammates and peers in the sales process that may include business developers, account managers, field representatives, product and market specialists, sales support, and channel partners. This alignment point also checks for vertical integration from the front line up through each layer of management. Does the program promote teamwork or does it have points of potential conflict? Are managers and the front line operating with congruent measures or are there priorities not intersecting?

  1. Set Objectives and Quotas

Quotas are the linchpin between the sales compensation plan and performance. Objectives and quotas should be market based, representing the relative opportunity in each account assignment or territory, and be created with a process that’s well-understood by reps, optimally incorporating their input. Over time, quota processes for an organization will usually move from more internally or historically-based approaches to more market-based approaches as the market and organization become more developed. In early stage companies or in newer markets, an organization may allocate the same goal to each rep, with the assumption that each has similar market opportunity and sales capability. While this may hold true over a period of years for a new business developer with an un-bounded territory, usually the normal growth of accounts will accumulate to create an installed base of recurring or expected revenue for each rep that will vary by territory or account assignment. Reps with more established accounts may carry a larger installed revenue base than those with newer accounts.

For many companies, looking at historic performance and projecting a trend forward seems to work for a period of time. However, they quickly learn that they’re either saddling their highest performers with ever-increasing goals or they’re overpaying reps who manage large bases of slow growth recurring revenue while under rewarding the brave new business developers bringing in new customers. Does each rep own a portion of the total business plan that represents a stretch level of achievement? Are quotas forward-looking or steeped in history? Do reps understand and buy-in to the objective setting process?

 

Next week I’ll write about the final step in the sales compensation design process: operating for results. Contact me at mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com with any questions.

 

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