C-Level in Sales Comp– Providing Strategic Direction

Picture1C-level executives (CEOs, COOs, CSOs, CMOs, and presidents,) get involved in various ways during the sales compensation process. Sometimes, as you may have seen in your own experiences, it’s not in the optimal way. Too much too late can wreak havoc on the design process. It can also undermine the heavy lifting already done by the design team and the confidence the C-level has placed in the team.

On the other hand, zero C-level involvement isn’t the right strategy, either. While the compensation design team may be brilliant, a brilliant sales compensation plan must line up with the vision for company-wide growth, which most often must come directly from the corner office.

We recently looked at C-level participation across a range of companies and found that high-value involvement peaks at the start of the process to provide strategic direction, at occasional review points to keep current and test the team, and again towards the end to review, approve, and support the plan from an executive level.

 From our research, 82 percent of C-level executives provide strategic direction on the priorities of the business relative to sales. These are the C-Level Goals described last week. Fifty-five percent also provide direction on how these strategies should be emphasized in the sales compensation plan.

Jeff Connor, chief growth officer for ARAMARK, describes his strategic involvement: “My role, at the end of the day, is for sales to function as a center of excellence.  I sit down with the people and make sure that we’re thoughtful about the strategy, the insights we’re building off of. I look at all the comp plans from a benchmark perspective and to try to help people understand whether they align with the strategy.

“Recently a business unit was looking at the Insight area, to use the Revenue Roadmap, and the strategic alignment,” Connor explains. “They built a model and straw person example. When I got involved my first role was to push and poke around the model to see if in fact it makes sense. Another thing I do, because I grew up here and was a direct seller for nine years, is to always put myself in the shoes of a sales executive. Do I understand it? Is it simple? Are the incentives things that I can control?”

How have you seen the C-Level successfully – or not – offer strategic direction in the sales comp plan?

Mark Donnolo is the managing partner of SalesGlobe and author of What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation. To learn more, visit SalesGlobe.

 

 

 

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