Training Without Coaching

A WSJ article once cited that, “With some studies suggesting that just 10% to 40% of training is ever used on the job, it is clear that a big chunk of the tens of billions of dollars organizations spend annually on staff development is going down the drain.”

Picture2Part of the problem – and, of course, the solution – lies in coaching.

When calculating the ROI of training, consider:

  • 25% of ROI comes from what you do before the event (the actual training).
  • 25% of ROI comes from the event itself.
  • 50% comes from activity after the event (coaching).

That’s half of the ROI, yet too few companies follow through with coaching. In a Sisyphean-like endeavor, sales organizations send folks through training, expect them to return transformed, and then watch as the organization inevitably returns to its old pre-training ways.

Not surprisingly, many companies (44%, according to a recent SalesGlobe survey) aren’t clear on the benefits of coaching and don’t measure the effectiveness of their sales coaching programs. Of those who do measure the effectiveness of coaching, the top benefits they see from their coaching programs are:

  • an increase in sales productivity per rep;
  • an increase in close rates;
  • an increase in their ability to cross sell or sell complex solutions or complex products;
  • an increase in revenue or profits.

In terms of ROI, about half of companies (48%) report that they get a return greater than their investment in coaching and development, or a return multiples greater than their investment. And an additional 32% of companies at least recover their costs from coaching.

So what’s your view on coaching? Necessary, unnecessary, or truly worthwhile?

Read an excerpt from our new book, “What Your CEO Needs to Know About Sales Compensation.” Or, to learn more, visit us at SalesGlobe.

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