To Cap or Not To Cap?

Now that the election is over and all those spirited Republican vs. Democrat office debates will start to cool down (maybe), here’s a fun idea: why not kick up some dust with a new fight? Should the sales compensation plan have a cap, or not?

This is a surefire way for some lively conversation.

A cap is an upper limit on incentive earnings. The benefits of caps include mitigating risk for the company. We’ve heard stories, and you probably have too, of a sales team or single rep hitting a mega-deal and raking in a seven-figure commission check. These stories scare the heck out of finance.

These stories also motivate the hell out of the sales organization, which brings us to the downside of caps: they can be very demoralizing. Even if the cap is way out in the stratosphere of potential earnings, its existence is felt. The sales organization knows there is a limit to their earnings, and they don’t like it. For the highest performing reps, they might ultimately look for a role in another company, one that doesn’t cap incentives.

While we don’t recommend caps, there are some legitimate reasons a company may employ them. For example, caps protect you against unexpected payouts resulting from mega-deals or bluebirds beyond the rep’s control, poorly set quotas, unreliable financial modeling, or production-constrained environments where demand may outpace supply or the company’s ability to maintain quality levels.

On the other hand, uncapping the plan requires good historic data and financial modeling. An uncapped plan must also be consistent with the sales culture of the organization, especially if reps may earn more than their managers or senior sales leaders, in some cases.

Caps are less about the math and more about the people and behaviors.

What’s your position in this spirited debate?

To learn more, please visit us at SalesGlobe.

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