Strategy and Sales Comp Part II: Putting it in Action

With all the power sales compensation can wield, it pays to invest the time to connect sales comp with the strategy of the business. Below is the second installment of nine important factors to consider when designing a sales comp plan that will drive more revenue. Read the first five in Strategy and Sales Comp Part 1: Making the Connection.

4. Reduce the complexity of the sales compensation plan. Often, the more technical an organization is – or the more engineering-oriented an organization is – the more complex the sales compensation plans will be. There’s a temptation to include everything even remotely important in the compensation plan. The key, however, is to include the two or three things that are most important to maintain clarity of message.

5. Manage the crediting and compensation costsMake sure you’re crediting the appropriate amount to people involved in the sales process without over-crediting. It’s a balance. We don’t want a single credit in a team sale or a complex sales process, nor do we want to over-credit. If you have too few credits people run to the opportunity and then run away very quickly once they realize somebody else has grabbed the credit. If you give too many credits, too many people belly up to the chuck wagon, and it motivates the wrong behaviors.

6. Increase sales productivity. The right daily actions of a sales person increase the overall activity of the organization. Sales compensation can be a powerful tool to motivate the right actions. Use sales compensation as a lever to drive productivity and to create the right motivations in the organization.

7. Control channel conflict.
In a multichannel environment with a direct sales organization and indirect channels, getting those resources to align to the customer is essential for success. Get these parties to work together without competing with each other or degrading your value proposition in front of the customer.

8.  Build a sales culture. The sales culture is an unspoken but powerful force in the organization. But assessing it is fairly subjective. A lot of organizations will say, “We’re over the top in sales culture.” Others will say, “We need to move in the direction of being sales-oriented but we don’t want to destroy the culture that we have. That’s very important to us.” As you make changes in sales programs and sales compensation programs, ask how those changes are going to support the culture. Also question the degree of change the organization can handle to make sure that we don’t push it in the wrong direction.

To learn more, visit SalesGlobe or email mark.donnolo@salesglobe.com. 

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